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Thorsmork Panorama

A Few of our Favourite FAQs

November 6, 2019

Thorsmork Panorama

A Few of our Favourite FAQs

November 6, 2019

Iceland is often described as magical, extreme and otherworldly. It makes sense then that our guests feel unsure about what to bring, how to prepare and what to expect. So, here are a few of our favourite frequently asked questions about Iceland.

Q: What time is sunrise/sunset?

A: We have no idea.

One of the more mind-boggling things about Iceland is the drastic changes in daylight throughout the year. Not only does daylight go from 4 to 21 hours in Reykjavik depending on the time of year, there’s also significant difference depending on where in Iceland you are. Most Icelanders don’t keep up with the exact timings, so if you ask a random local about sunrise and sunset on a particular day, there’s a 99% chance they don’t know.
Get an app that specifically tells you the times of sunset or sunrise at any given place or visit this website for accurate timings. That’s what we do.

Q: What should I wear on a northern lights tour?

A: Overdress.

You may think it’s going to be cold and that you’re prepared, but what most people don’t realize is that once you see those northern lights dancing in the sky above you, you’ll most likely be awestruck and immobile and that’s when the cold really sets in. Take extra care of feet, hands and your head, because that’s where the heat primarily leaves your body. Don’t do your shoes up too tight because you need that extra air in your boots for warmth. Wear thermal underwear, lots of wool and a good shell. For more tips on what to wear in Iceland, click here.

Q: Are there trees in Iceland?

A: Yes.

Admittedly, they aren’t that many and they’re not very tall. While there are a few “adult-sized” woods in Iceland, to an Icelander, a big forest with tall trees usually feels like something out of a children’s fairy tale. On the upside, the lack of large forests and tall trees means amazing views of the island’s magnificent landscapes.

Q: Do Icelanders really believe in Elves?

A: No. But also yes. It’s complicated.

Iceland has numerous old folk tales, fables and modern-day encounters with elves, but perhaps the most noteworthy example of how present the “hidden folk” are in our lives is the fact that road construction and development has not only been stalled but permanently altered due to the presence of elves. Whether you believe in them or not, nobody wants to risk disturbing the elves.
A 2018 survey revealed that “only” 31% of Icelanders believe in elves, while 54% believe in God. The headline read “More Icelanders believe in God than elves”. Keep in mind that the two are in no way mutually exclusive.
It does help to understand what elves really are. Most now view them as the personification of Mother Nature and as such they are magical, beautiful and both more powerful and virtuous than humans. They demand respect, reward good deeds generously but also take terrible vengeance if provoked. Just like Mother Nature.

Q: How do I get to and from Keflavík Airport?

A: Take the Flybus.

Finally, an easy question! Landing at Keflavik International Airport is often described as landing on the moon. It’s surrounded by a huge lava field and while the landscape is indeed dramatic, it really doesn’t feel like a hub of public transportation. The drive to Reykjavik takes approx. 40 minutes but don’t worry, we’ve got your back. The Flybus departs from Keflavik 35-40 minutes after each arrival, right outside the terminal. Book online in advance for the best price.

Q: What is the biggest faux pas I could make in Iceland?

A: Not showering properly before entering a pool.

Our pools are a way of life, the emblem of our shared natural resource, geothermal water. It is considered unhygienic and just rude not to shower without a swimsuit and with soap before entering the pool. There are more faux pas of course, but this one is the biggie. You can read up on other common faux pas here.

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Nature Pool

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Capturing the Northern Lights

A few handy tips and tricks to make it easier for you to capture those unforgettable northern lights on your camera or smartphone.

Read more
Thorsmork Panorama

A Few of our Favourite FAQs

November 6, 2019

Thorsmork Panorama

A Few of our Favourite FAQs

November 6, 2019

Iceland is often described as magical, extreme and otherworldly. It makes sense then that our guests feel unsure about what to bring, how to prepare and what to expect. So, here are a few of our favourite frequently asked questions about Iceland.

Q: What time is sunrise/sunset?

A: We have no idea.

One of the more mind-boggling things about Iceland is the drastic changes in daylight throughout the year. Not only does daylight go from 4 to 21 hours in Reykjavik depending on the time of year, there’s also significant difference depending on where in Iceland you are. Most Icelanders don’t keep up with the exact timings, so if you ask a random local about sunrise and sunset on a particular day, there’s a 99% chance they don’t know.
Get an app that specifically tells you the times of sunset or sunrise at any given place or visit this website for accurate timings. That’s what we do.

Q: What should I wear on a northern lights tour?

A: Overdress.

You may think it’s going to be cold and that you’re prepared, but what most people don’t realize is that once you see those northern lights dancing in the sky above you, you’ll most likely be awestruck and immobile and that’s when the cold really sets in. Take extra care of feet, hands and your head, because that’s where the heat primarily leaves your body. Don’t do your shoes up too tight because you need that extra air in your boots for warmth. Wear thermal underwear, lots of wool and a good shell. For more tips on what to wear in Iceland, click here.

Q: Are there trees in Iceland?

A: Yes.

Admittedly, they aren’t that many and they’re not very tall. While there are a few “adult-sized” woods in Iceland, to an Icelander, a big forest with tall trees usually feels like something out of a children’s fairy tale. On the upside, the lack of large forests and tall trees means amazing views of the island’s magnificent landscapes.

Q: Do Icelanders really believe in Elves?

A: No. But also yes. It’s complicated.

Iceland has numerous old folk tales, fables and modern-day encounters with elves, but perhaps the most noteworthy example of how present the “hidden folk” are in our lives is the fact that road construction and development has not only been stalled but permanently altered due to the presence of elves. Whether you believe in them or not, nobody wants to risk disturbing the elves.
A 2018 survey revealed that “only” 31% of Icelanders believe in elves, while 54% believe in God. The headline read “More Icelanders believe in God than elves”. Keep in mind that the two are in no way mutually exclusive.
It does help to understand what elves really are. Most now view them as the personification of Mother Nature and as such they are magical, beautiful and both more powerful and virtuous than humans. They demand respect, reward good deeds generously but also take terrible vengeance if provoked. Just like Mother Nature.

Q: How do I get to and from Keflavík Airport?

A: Take the Flybus.

Finally, an easy question! Landing at Keflavik International Airport is often described as landing on the moon. It’s surrounded by a huge lava field and while the landscape is indeed dramatic, it really doesn’t feel like a hub of public transportation. The drive to Reykjavik takes approx. 40 minutes but don’t worry, we’ve got your back. The Flybus departs from Keflavik 35-40 minutes after each arrival, right outside the terminal. Book online in advance for the best price.

Q: What is the biggest faux pas I could make in Iceland?

A: Not showering properly before entering a pool.

Our pools are a way of life, the emblem of our shared natural resource, geothermal water. It is considered unhygienic and just rude not to shower without a swimsuit and with soap before entering the pool. There are more faux pas of course, but this one is the biggie. You can read up on other common faux pas here.

RE17
iStock-825267104
Nature Pool

The RE blog

RE63
Landmannalaugar Saga Valley
Thorsmork Panorama
Nature Pool
BlueLagoon1
Skógafoss waterfall Iceland hero mynd
RE05-Reykjavik Panorama
Into the Glacier
Fjaðrárgljúfur
kirkjufell-12x7
Golden-Circle-and-Fontana-Steam-bath
Reykjanes

Capturing the Northern Lights

A few handy tips and tricks to make it easier for you to capture those unforgettable northern lights on your camera or smartphone.

Read more