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Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland: Top Things to Do

The Reykjanes Peninsula is often overlooked in favour of Iceland’s more famous sights. In this article, discover why you shouldn’t make the same mistake.

11. júlí 2023

Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland: Top Things to Do

The Reykjanes Peninsula is often overlooked in favour of Iceland’s more famous sights. In this article, discover why you shouldn’t make the same mistake.

11. júlí 2023

Once overshadowed by more well-known destinations, the Reykjanes Peninsula, situated to the southwest of Reykjavik, is now stepping into the limelight. This stunning corner of Iceland, adorned with UNESCO sites, soothing spas, and remarkable geothermal areas, was often bypassed by visitors. However, the recent eruptions of the Fagradalsfjall volcano has catapulted this region into well-deserved global fame.

Today, Reykjanes is attracting the curious eyes of travelers worldwide, eager to witness its raw beauty. The peninsula's unique blend of breathtaking landscapes, natural phenomena, and first-rate attractions now stands as a testament to Iceland's untamed allure. Don't miss the opportunity to explore this rising star of Icelandic tourism, a place where earth's fiery heart meets the cool Nordic skies."

1. Explore the Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark

In Icelandic, Reykjanes means something like “the smoking peninsula”—and this provides a sense of what you can find here. It’s not smoking because of any man-made thing or activity, but because of the activity of the earth itself.

Reykjanes is one of the most geothermally active areas in Iceland, if not the world. In this region, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge—between the European and North American continents—rises out of the ocean, revealing the powerful processes that created all of Iceland in the first place. They call Reykjanes the youngest area of Iceland, precisely because it’s still being created.

That means that across the peninsula you’ll find rugged lava formations, shield volcanoes, black-sand plains, and other geothermal landforms. As a result of the sheer variety, it’s been recognised by UNESCO as a place of global geological importance.

The UNESCO Reykjanes Geopark is criss-crossed by hiking trails that make all these wonders really easy to explore. What’s more, with abandoned farmsteads, picturesque lighthouses, and astonishing coastal landscape, thers a lot more to see too.

Be mindful, however. In 2021 and 2022, Reykjanes experienced minor earthquakes and volcanic eruptions for the first time in nearly 800 years, leading specialists to anticipate a likely eruption. Presently, with the most recent eruption in 2023, it provides an extraordinary chance to observe volcanic activity in proximity.

2. Witness an active volcano

Among all the wonders produced by geothermal activity, there’s nothing quite as awesome and powerful as a volcano itself. The Reykjanes Peninsula is home to an active volcano that has erupted three times since 2021, with the most recent one in July, 2023.

__According to geological experts, this fiery spectacle is expected to remain active for decades, punctuated by periods of calm.

While a volcanic eruption may conjure images of danger and destruction, rest assured that this volcano has proved to be safe to witness from a distance. The Reykjanes Peninsula offers visitors the thrilling opportunity to safely observe a volcanic eruptiom!

Imagine standing on the edge of this dramatic landscape, mesmerized by the sight of molten lava flowing like a river, painting the terrain with its glowing warmth.

Even if you don't catch an eruption in progress, the atmosphere around the volcano is an experience in itself. Even after solidified, the new lava fields are smoking and radiating heat for months or years!

3. Unwind in the Blue Lagoon

Alongside the thrill and power of geothermal activity, Reykjanes offers one of Iceland’s best-known opportunities to relax. That’s the Blue Lagoon, a spa known for its silky blue waters and therapeutic benefits.

With its healing waters, sumptuous suites, and gourmet dining, the Blue Lagoon deserves its reputation as a luxurious spa destination. Here, you’ll have the chance to truly unwind and forget the stresses of life back home.

Locals have been doing that since the early eighties, when the Lagoon’s warm blue waters were discovered. These waters run off from the geothermal site, Svartsengi, next door, which actually provides local homes with their warm water. Alongside a perfect place to chill, it’s a marvellous feat of engineering too.

There are many different ways to visit the Blue Lagoon. Come for the day, stay the night, or combine a visit with a tour of Reykjanes. Whichever option you choose, we bet you won’t want to leave.


Geothermal water of Iceland


Blue Lagoon

Iceland is perhaps the most dynamic volcanic area in the world, with incredible geothermal landforms including geysers, lava fields, and even occasional volcanic eruptions too.

Yet while that has an obvious fascination for visitors to Iceland, the locals typically benefit from this in a different way. All of that geothermal energy beneath our feet goes to heat our water, power our homes, and even support our industry. In fact, 90% of the hot water in Iceland is heated by the power of the earth.

That includes the water in spas such as the Blue Lagoon and the Sky Lagoon, along with the many other spa destinations across the country. When you bathe in these, you’re relaxing in water warmed by magma.

Find out more in our complete guide to Iceland’s geothermal water


4. Discover the Gunnuhver Hot Springs

Among the many incredible sights across the Reykjanes Peninsula, there are a handful that stand out. At the far southwestern point of the region, Gunnuhver is one that you shouldn't miss.

Gunnuhver is known for its hot springs, fumaroles, and mud pools, three geothermal phenomena produced when underground heat forces water out of the ground. For example, see Iceland’s largest mud pool, a boiling vat of clay that you’d hardly expect to see on Planet Earth. Its huge size has engulfed a nearby path.

Look out at Gunnuhver’s landscape and witness an ethereal scene shrouded in steam, created by the very same natural processes as the Blue Lagoon. It’s truly a testament to the power of the earth.

Don’t miss the story of how the area took its name. Gunna was a local woman who starved herself to death 400 years ago when she was wronged by her landlord. As a ghost, she took her grisly revenge on him and his wife and terrorised the locals. Only a priest could save the community, who trapped her in a hot spring. They say you can still see her fighting to get out. - Explore Gunnuhver on a Reykjanes hike

5. Wonder at the Seltún geothermal area

Just half an hour from the centre of Reykjavik, Seltún feels like you’ve landed on a different planet. Often referred to by the name Krýsuvík, it’s one of the most important geothermal areas in Iceland, providing an opportunity to glimpse some of the stranger shapes and forms produced by the earth.

Take your time to enjoy the bubbling pots of mud, steaming fumaroles, and hot springs. The billowing clouds of steam add to the area’s mystery.

Yet the real highlight here is the colours that paint the area. Minerals that rise up from the vents in the earth turn the nearby rocks yellow, silver, blue, and red. These multicoloured hills make for one of Iceland’s most striking landscapes.

While you can hike up to the top of the hills, you should be careful when near the springs. Keep to the paths, because the water and mud are both incredibly hot—and can be dangerous.

6. Hike to the Kleifarvatn lake

The largest lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula is Kleifarvatn. At the bottom of an enormous crater on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it makes for a strange sight. With no water visibly passing into the lake, or coming out, there doesn’t seem to be any good reason why it’s there at all.

The answer to this conundrum is simple: water feeds the lake from underground. Yet that makes it vulnerable to the movements of the earth in this volatile region. For example, earthquakes in the year 2000 caused the size of Kleifarvatn to decrease by 20%—and it’s still getting smaller today.

Beside the lake itself, there’s plenty to do. You can hike up the hills that tower of the lake, or explore the shapes of the lava that has cooled nearby. Alternatively, if you’re feeling adventurous, join a scuba-diving tour of Kleifarvatn. The waters here are some of the clearest in the world.


Volcanoes in Iceland


IN 3

Iceland is known as the Land of Ice and Fire for good reason. “Fire” refers to the fact that it’s one of the most volcanically active countries on the planet. In fact, there are 30 volcanoes that are considered active or dormant in Iceland—and eruptions happen on average every two or three years.

You may well remember the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 that halted air traffic around the world. Or, more recently, on the Reykjanes Peninsula, the volcano known as Geldingadalur has been erupting too.

If you’re thinking of coming to Iceland, you really shouldn’t miss the opportunity to see volcanic activity for yourself. What’s special—and very convenient—about the recent eruptions in Reykjanes is that they’re very safe to see. As a result, a visit to the site has become a very popular stop on visitors’ itineraries.

Find out more in our guide to volcanoes in Iceland volcanoes in Iceland


7. Visit Reykjanes lighthouse

It’s not only geothermal sights that you can see in Reykjanes. In fact, it’s an area steeped in history, thanks largely to its connection with the sea. If you’re looking to explore some of Iceland’s past while enjoying some incredible sea views, the Reykjanes lighthouse is the place to go.

A lighthouse at the point of the peninsula where the current structure stands was the very first lighthouse in Iceland, built in 1878. Yet, by 1905, a series of earthquakes, combined with the power of the sea, meant that the building was at risk of collapse.

The lighthouse that you see today, up on the Bæjarfell hill, was built in 1908 and it has since been dubbed Iceland’s favourite lighthouse. It stands in an incredible position, overlooking the rugged coast of Reykjanes and the steaming fields of Gunnuhver.

That said, it’s far from the only lighthouse on the peninsula. In fact, thanks to tricky sailing conditions and a busy fishing community, there are 13 lighthouses around Reykjanes. You can decide your own personal favourite.

8. Experience the Reykjanes Peninsula on an ATV

Why not see the wonders of Reykjanes from a different perspective? On an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), add some high-octane thrill to your experience. It’s an opportunity to combine Reykjanes’s spectacular sights with a bit of adventure.

On an ATV tour, you can power your off-road vehicle up the mountains of Hagafell and Húsafell and catch views over all of the peninsula. On clear days, you can see as far as Eldey island, the enormous lump of rock in the sea behind Reykjanes lighthouse.

You can also explore the coastal areas, where you’ll find lighthouses, shipwrecks, and black-sand beaches. Overall, it’s an incredible ride.


Honeymoon in Iceland


ice caving

IWith its spas, natural wonders, gorgeous hotels, and luxury dining experiences, Iceland is the perfect destination for a honeymoon. Whether you want a cosy winter trip or a summer tour packed with beauty and outdoor fun, you’ll find everything you need for a romantic stay.

For example, what could be more romantic than seeing the northern lights? With their dazzling display of colour against the night sky, they make for an unforgettable experience.

Or try the Sky Lagoon, Iceland’s newest spa destination, to blissfully relax in state-of-the-art facilities. The warm waters overlook the North Atlantic Ocean, providing breathtaking views of the northern lights during the winter. Whatever you’re planning for your once in a lifetime trip, Iceland can make it extra special.

Learn more in our guide to spending your honeymoon in Iceland


Frequently asked questions about Reykjanes

Still have questions about the Reykjanes Peninsula? Here we provide you with the answers.

Is Reykjanes Peninsula worthwhile?

Reykjanes Peninsula is truly one of the most incredible regions in all of Iceland. That means it’s definitely worth spending some time in the area. After all, it’s a UNESCO site for a reason. Whether you’re after spa experiences or coastal walks, geothermal wonders or historic sights, there’s something here for everyone. Don’t miss out.

Is Reykjavik on the Reykjanes Peninsula?

The Reykjanes Peninsula is the name of the area that extends to the southwest below Reykjavik. While the capital city is close by, it’s generally not considered to be part of the peninsula itself. In fact, Reykjavik has its own peninsula, Seltjarnarnes.

How old is Reykjanes Peninsula?

It’s said that Reykjanes is the youngest part of Iceland, thanks to geothermal activity that bubbles up from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Its origins date back about six or seven million years. That might sound old, but given that the rest of Iceland could be as much as 20 million years old, the peninsula is still a youngster.

Where is the Bridge Between the Continents?

The Bridge Between Continents is the name given to a footbridge that crosses a rift in the earth. But this is not any simple canyon. This is the gap that separates the European continent from North America.

Hence the bridge’s name. Here you complete the seemingly magical feat of crossing between two continents in a matter of seconds. The bridge is only 15 metres (50 feet) long.

The Bridge Between Continents is located at the far western end of the Reykjanes Peninsula, about 7 kilometres (4.35 miles) north of Gunnuhver.

Is Keflavík worth a visit?

Keflavík is the home of Iceland’s international airport, and as such you’ll be passing through the area regardless of your plans. However, the town of Keflavík itself is not typically on visitors’ itineraries.

That’s a shame, because there are some great things to do in Keflavík and the larger Reykjanesbær municipality. For example, visit the Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll, or check out Viking World, with its enormous replica of an original Viking ship.

What top attractions are a must-see in Reykjanes Peninsula?

Among all the sights that are on offer in Reykjanes, there are some that you really shouldn’t miss: - The Blue Lagoon. It’s deservingly world famous for its tranquil, therapeutic blue waters. Don’t miss a chance to unwind. - The Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark. The site of some of the most awesome geothermal activity in the world, the Geopark is unique. - The Bridge Between Continents. Cross the gulf between two tectonic plates. It’s an opportunity you won’t have anywhere else.

How long does it take to walk to Fagradalsfjall volcano?

The hike up to the viewpoint over Fagradalsfjall takes only about 40 minutes. Then you’ll need to walk the same distance back. Remember to bring some sturdy shoes!

Visit Reykjanes with Reykjavik Excursions

With UNESCO sites, world-famous spas, and some of the most incredible volcanic scenes on the planet, Reykjanes Peninsula shouldn’t be missed on your trip to Iceland.

At Reykjavik Excursions, we make it easy. Offering a range of tours to different destinations on the peninsula, we can take you to wherever you want to go. If you prefer group tours or private trips, you can trust us to provide.

Start planning your trip by exploring our Reykjanes Peninsula tours.

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!

Litli-Hrútur Eruption 2023 - The New Eruption near Fagradalsfjall on the Reykjanes Peninsula

Once again, the enthralling spectacle of Iceland's Reykjanes volcano is back in the limelight! After 11 months of peaceful dormancy, the volcano is now alive and kicking, treating locals and tourists to another captivating visual performance. If you've been yearning for an adventure that's truly out of this world, this might just be your calling!

Lesa blogg

Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland: Top Things to Do

The Reykjanes Peninsula is often overlooked in favour of Iceland’s more famous sights. In this article, discover why you shouldn’t make the same mistake.

11. júlí 2023

Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland: Top Things to Do

The Reykjanes Peninsula is often overlooked in favour of Iceland’s more famous sights. In this article, discover why you shouldn’t make the same mistake.

11. júlí 2023

Once overshadowed by more well-known destinations, the Reykjanes Peninsula, situated to the southwest of Reykjavik, is now stepping into the limelight. This stunning corner of Iceland, adorned with UNESCO sites, soothing spas, and remarkable geothermal areas, was often bypassed by visitors. However, the recent eruptions of the Fagradalsfjall volcano has catapulted this region into well-deserved global fame.

Today, Reykjanes is attracting the curious eyes of travelers worldwide, eager to witness its raw beauty. The peninsula's unique blend of breathtaking landscapes, natural phenomena, and first-rate attractions now stands as a testament to Iceland's untamed allure. Don't miss the opportunity to explore this rising star of Icelandic tourism, a place where earth's fiery heart meets the cool Nordic skies."

1. Explore the Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark

In Icelandic, Reykjanes means something like “the smoking peninsula”—and this provides a sense of what you can find here. It’s not smoking because of any man-made thing or activity, but because of the activity of the earth itself.

Reykjanes is one of the most geothermally active areas in Iceland, if not the world. In this region, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge—between the European and North American continents—rises out of the ocean, revealing the powerful processes that created all of Iceland in the first place. They call Reykjanes the youngest area of Iceland, precisely because it’s still being created.

That means that across the peninsula you’ll find rugged lava formations, shield volcanoes, black-sand plains, and other geothermal landforms. As a result of the sheer variety, it’s been recognised by UNESCO as a place of global geological importance.

The UNESCO Reykjanes Geopark is criss-crossed by hiking trails that make all these wonders really easy to explore. What’s more, with abandoned farmsteads, picturesque lighthouses, and astonishing coastal landscape, thers a lot more to see too.

Be mindful, however. In 2021 and 2022, Reykjanes experienced minor earthquakes and volcanic eruptions for the first time in nearly 800 years, leading specialists to anticipate a likely eruption. Presently, with the most recent eruption in 2023, it provides an extraordinary chance to observe volcanic activity in proximity.

2. Witness an active volcano

Among all the wonders produced by geothermal activity, there’s nothing quite as awesome and powerful as a volcano itself. The Reykjanes Peninsula is home to an active volcano that has erupted three times since 2021, with the most recent one in July, 2023.

__According to geological experts, this fiery spectacle is expected to remain active for decades, punctuated by periods of calm.

While a volcanic eruption may conjure images of danger and destruction, rest assured that this volcano has proved to be safe to witness from a distance. The Reykjanes Peninsula offers visitors the thrilling opportunity to safely observe a volcanic eruptiom!

Imagine standing on the edge of this dramatic landscape, mesmerized by the sight of molten lava flowing like a river, painting the terrain with its glowing warmth.

Even if you don't catch an eruption in progress, the atmosphere around the volcano is an experience in itself. Even after solidified, the new lava fields are smoking and radiating heat for months or years!

3. Unwind in the Blue Lagoon

Alongside the thrill and power of geothermal activity, Reykjanes offers one of Iceland’s best-known opportunities to relax. That’s the Blue Lagoon, a spa known for its silky blue waters and therapeutic benefits.

With its healing waters, sumptuous suites, and gourmet dining, the Blue Lagoon deserves its reputation as a luxurious spa destination. Here, you’ll have the chance to truly unwind and forget the stresses of life back home.

Locals have been doing that since the early eighties, when the Lagoon’s warm blue waters were discovered. These waters run off from the geothermal site, Svartsengi, next door, which actually provides local homes with their warm water. Alongside a perfect place to chill, it’s a marvellous feat of engineering too.

There are many different ways to visit the Blue Lagoon. Come for the day, stay the night, or combine a visit with a tour of Reykjanes. Whichever option you choose, we bet you won’t want to leave.


Geothermal water of Iceland


Blue Lagoon

Iceland is perhaps the most dynamic volcanic area in the world, with incredible geothermal landforms including geysers, lava fields, and even occasional volcanic eruptions too.

Yet while that has an obvious fascination for visitors to Iceland, the locals typically benefit from this in a different way. All of that geothermal energy beneath our feet goes to heat our water, power our homes, and even support our industry. In fact, 90% of the hot water in Iceland is heated by the power of the earth.

That includes the water in spas such as the Blue Lagoon and the Sky Lagoon, along with the many other spa destinations across the country. When you bathe in these, you’re relaxing in water warmed by magma.

Find out more in our complete guide to Iceland’s geothermal water


4. Discover the Gunnuhver Hot Springs

Among the many incredible sights across the Reykjanes Peninsula, there are a handful that stand out. At the far southwestern point of the region, Gunnuhver is one that you shouldn't miss.

Gunnuhver is known for its hot springs, fumaroles, and mud pools, three geothermal phenomena produced when underground heat forces water out of the ground. For example, see Iceland’s largest mud pool, a boiling vat of clay that you’d hardly expect to see on Planet Earth. Its huge size has engulfed a nearby path.

Look out at Gunnuhver’s landscape and witness an ethereal scene shrouded in steam, created by the very same natural processes as the Blue Lagoon. It’s truly a testament to the power of the earth.

Don’t miss the story of how the area took its name. Gunna was a local woman who starved herself to death 400 years ago when she was wronged by her landlord. As a ghost, she took her grisly revenge on him and his wife and terrorised the locals. Only a priest could save the community, who trapped her in a hot spring. They say you can still see her fighting to get out. - Explore Gunnuhver on a Reykjanes hike

5. Wonder at the Seltún geothermal area

Just half an hour from the centre of Reykjavik, Seltún feels like you’ve landed on a different planet. Often referred to by the name Krýsuvík, it’s one of the most important geothermal areas in Iceland, providing an opportunity to glimpse some of the stranger shapes and forms produced by the earth.

Take your time to enjoy the bubbling pots of mud, steaming fumaroles, and hot springs. The billowing clouds of steam add to the area’s mystery.

Yet the real highlight here is the colours that paint the area. Minerals that rise up from the vents in the earth turn the nearby rocks yellow, silver, blue, and red. These multicoloured hills make for one of Iceland’s most striking landscapes.

While you can hike up to the top of the hills, you should be careful when near the springs. Keep to the paths, because the water and mud are both incredibly hot—and can be dangerous.

6. Hike to the Kleifarvatn lake

The largest lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula is Kleifarvatn. At the bottom of an enormous crater on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it makes for a strange sight. With no water visibly passing into the lake, or coming out, there doesn’t seem to be any good reason why it’s there at all.

The answer to this conundrum is simple: water feeds the lake from underground. Yet that makes it vulnerable to the movements of the earth in this volatile region. For example, earthquakes in the year 2000 caused the size of Kleifarvatn to decrease by 20%—and it’s still getting smaller today.

Beside the lake itself, there’s plenty to do. You can hike up the hills that tower of the lake, or explore the shapes of the lava that has cooled nearby. Alternatively, if you’re feeling adventurous, join a scuba-diving tour of Kleifarvatn. The waters here are some of the clearest in the world.


Volcanoes in Iceland


IN 3

Iceland is known as the Land of Ice and Fire for good reason. “Fire” refers to the fact that it’s one of the most volcanically active countries on the planet. In fact, there are 30 volcanoes that are considered active or dormant in Iceland—and eruptions happen on average every two or three years.

You may well remember the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 that halted air traffic around the world. Or, more recently, on the Reykjanes Peninsula, the volcano known as Geldingadalur has been erupting too.

If you’re thinking of coming to Iceland, you really shouldn’t miss the opportunity to see volcanic activity for yourself. What’s special—and very convenient—about the recent eruptions in Reykjanes is that they’re very safe to see. As a result, a visit to the site has become a very popular stop on visitors’ itineraries.

Find out more in our guide to volcanoes in Iceland volcanoes in Iceland


7. Visit Reykjanes lighthouse

It’s not only geothermal sights that you can see in Reykjanes. In fact, it’s an area steeped in history, thanks largely to its connection with the sea. If you’re looking to explore some of Iceland’s past while enjoying some incredible sea views, the Reykjanes lighthouse is the place to go.

A lighthouse at the point of the peninsula where the current structure stands was the very first lighthouse in Iceland, built in 1878. Yet, by 1905, a series of earthquakes, combined with the power of the sea, meant that the building was at risk of collapse.

The lighthouse that you see today, up on the Bæjarfell hill, was built in 1908 and it has since been dubbed Iceland’s favourite lighthouse. It stands in an incredible position, overlooking the rugged coast of Reykjanes and the steaming fields of Gunnuhver.

That said, it’s far from the only lighthouse on the peninsula. In fact, thanks to tricky sailing conditions and a busy fishing community, there are 13 lighthouses around Reykjanes. You can decide your own personal favourite.

8. Experience the Reykjanes Peninsula on an ATV

Why not see the wonders of Reykjanes from a different perspective? On an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), add some high-octane thrill to your experience. It’s an opportunity to combine Reykjanes’s spectacular sights with a bit of adventure.

On an ATV tour, you can power your off-road vehicle up the mountains of Hagafell and Húsafell and catch views over all of the peninsula. On clear days, you can see as far as Eldey island, the enormous lump of rock in the sea behind Reykjanes lighthouse.

You can also explore the coastal areas, where you’ll find lighthouses, shipwrecks, and black-sand beaches. Overall, it’s an incredible ride.


Honeymoon in Iceland


ice caving

IWith its spas, natural wonders, gorgeous hotels, and luxury dining experiences, Iceland is the perfect destination for a honeymoon. Whether you want a cosy winter trip or a summer tour packed with beauty and outdoor fun, you’ll find everything you need for a romantic stay.

For example, what could be more romantic than seeing the northern lights? With their dazzling display of colour against the night sky, they make for an unforgettable experience.

Or try the Sky Lagoon, Iceland’s newest spa destination, to blissfully relax in state-of-the-art facilities. The warm waters overlook the North Atlantic Ocean, providing breathtaking views of the northern lights during the winter. Whatever you’re planning for your once in a lifetime trip, Iceland can make it extra special.

Learn more in our guide to spending your honeymoon in Iceland


Frequently asked questions about Reykjanes

Still have questions about the Reykjanes Peninsula? Here we provide you with the answers.

Is Reykjanes Peninsula worthwhile?

Reykjanes Peninsula is truly one of the most incredible regions in all of Iceland. That means it’s definitely worth spending some time in the area. After all, it’s a UNESCO site for a reason. Whether you’re after spa experiences or coastal walks, geothermal wonders or historic sights, there’s something here for everyone. Don’t miss out.

Is Reykjavik on the Reykjanes Peninsula?

The Reykjanes Peninsula is the name of the area that extends to the southwest below Reykjavik. While the capital city is close by, it’s generally not considered to be part of the peninsula itself. In fact, Reykjavik has its own peninsula, Seltjarnarnes.

How old is Reykjanes Peninsula?

It’s said that Reykjanes is the youngest part of Iceland, thanks to geothermal activity that bubbles up from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Its origins date back about six or seven million years. That might sound old, but given that the rest of Iceland could be as much as 20 million years old, the peninsula is still a youngster.

Where is the Bridge Between the Continents?

The Bridge Between Continents is the name given to a footbridge that crosses a rift in the earth. But this is not any simple canyon. This is the gap that separates the European continent from North America.

Hence the bridge’s name. Here you complete the seemingly magical feat of crossing between two continents in a matter of seconds. The bridge is only 15 metres (50 feet) long.

The Bridge Between Continents is located at the far western end of the Reykjanes Peninsula, about 7 kilometres (4.35 miles) north of Gunnuhver.

Is Keflavík worth a visit?

Keflavík is the home of Iceland’s international airport, and as such you’ll be passing through the area regardless of your plans. However, the town of Keflavík itself is not typically on visitors’ itineraries.

That’s a shame, because there are some great things to do in Keflavík and the larger Reykjanesbær municipality. For example, visit the Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll, or check out Viking World, with its enormous replica of an original Viking ship.

What top attractions are a must-see in Reykjanes Peninsula?

Among all the sights that are on offer in Reykjanes, there are some that you really shouldn’t miss: - The Blue Lagoon. It’s deservingly world famous for its tranquil, therapeutic blue waters. Don’t miss a chance to unwind. - The Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark. The site of some of the most awesome geothermal activity in the world, the Geopark is unique. - The Bridge Between Continents. Cross the gulf between two tectonic plates. It’s an opportunity you won’t have anywhere else.

How long does it take to walk to Fagradalsfjall volcano?

The hike up to the viewpoint over Fagradalsfjall takes only about 40 minutes. Then you’ll need to walk the same distance back. Remember to bring some sturdy shoes!

Visit Reykjanes with Reykjavik Excursions

With UNESCO sites, world-famous spas, and some of the most incredible volcanic scenes on the planet, Reykjanes Peninsula shouldn’t be missed on your trip to Iceland.

At Reykjavik Excursions, we make it easy. Offering a range of tours to different destinations on the peninsula, we can take you to wherever you want to go. If you prefer group tours or private trips, you can trust us to provide.

Start planning your trip by exploring our Reykjanes Peninsula tours.

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!