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What to do in Iceland- your top adventures guide

Discover Iceland’s wild side with adventures and activities that bring you close to nature

9. mars 2023

What to do in Iceland- your top adventures guide

Discover Iceland’s wild side with adventures and activities that bring you close to nature

9. mars 2023

It may be a compact nation, but the little island of Iceland is awash with activities and experiences to bring you closer to nature. From the rugged mountains of the interior to the black-sanded beaches of the Atlantic shore, Iceland’s scenery is set up for outdoor activities. Whether you’re an adrenaline junkie looking for adventure or prefer a more sedate session of horse riding, hiking and sightseeing, we have rounded up Iceland’s best activities to help you curate the ideal break to this beautiful island.

Horseback riding

While many countries across the globe offer horse riding experiences, Iceland has a pure breed of horse that makes a trail across the bridle paths a unique experience. Famously sturdy, friendly and shorter than most breeds, there’s some debate over whether or not Iceland’s horses are actually ponies. Either way, a leisurely canter on horseback over Iceland’s dramatic lava fields is a great way to spend an afternoon.

Snæfellsnes National Park has a range of places to rent horses and an other-worldly landscape to admire as you trot along. If you’re staying in Reykjavik and don’t have a lot of time, you can embark on a lava tour which includes horseback riding across solidified molten rock, just outside the capital.

Perhaps pair a session on horseback with a trip along The Golden Circle. Hit the major natural wonders of Iceland – Gulfoss waterfall, Geysir area of geothermal activity and Þingvellir national park – before taking in the scenery around Eldhestar riding centre from atop a friendly Icelandic horse.

ATV Adventures

A real adventure awaits with an ATV ride across Iceland’s distinctive scenery. Hopping on a quad bike, you can power across the black-sand beaches of south Iceland as the wild Atlantic Ocean crashes against the shore. Fording rivers and bumping across rugged terrain, you can reach the haunting DC3 plane wreck on the beach – made famous in music videos by Justin Beiber and Sigur Ros.

If you are pushed for time or you are exploring the south coast under your own steam, then an hour-long quad bike adventure might be the best option for you. You’ll get a taste of adrenaline across the jet-sanded beaches and still get to stop at the wreck of the DC3 plane for a photograph or two. Or, take it slow with a post-ATV soak in a geothermal hot spring. After an adrenaline-fuelled ride across the volcanic landscape, five minutes from The Blue Lagoon, slip into the milky blue water to soothe aching muscles.


Adrenaline junkies rejoice with a huge selection of adventure tours in Iceland to get the heart pumping.


atv tour iceland

From ziplining high above the rugged hills and rivers of Vik to hiking atop frozen glaciers, Iceland is not short of activities for the adventurous traveller. Check out our complete adventure guide to Iceland to find the daring activity for you.


Did you know you can take an ATV tour in Reykjavik itself? Just a fifteen-minute drive from the centre of the city sees you at the edge of the wilderness where you can power past beautiful Lake Hafravatn and even summit a mountain, biking up to the top of Hafrafell mountain.

The view from the top, across the Bláfjöll mountain range to steel-grey Faxaflói Bay is not to be missed. In summer, a very different experience is on offer with a midnight ATV tour. From the suburbs of Reykjavik, you depart late at night when the twilight sky is still streaked orange and gold.
Thingvellir National Park
## Snowmobiling

If you prefer your landscape a little more Arctic and frozen, then maybe a snowmobiling experience is for you. Nearly 11% of Iceland’s entire landmass is covered by ice caps and glaciers, and shooting across the frozen surface on a snowmobile is the ultimate glacier adventure. Various ice caps across the country can be seen from the seat of a snowmobile and Langjökull is the closest to Reykjavik.
Thingvellir National Park

For a full day immersed in nature, consider snowmobiling on the Golden Circle route, stopping for a heart-pumping session at Langjökull after experiencing thundering waterfalls, ravines and explosive geysers.

Plugging the active Katla volcano system, get to know Iceland’s fourth-largest ice cap with snowmobiling on Mýrdalsjökull glacier. On the south shore, this experience is ideal for those exploring the black-sand beaches, glacier lakes and other natural wonders in the area.


Discover a vast, frozen ice cap between two of Iceland’s most active volcano systems at Sólheimajökull glacier


snpwmobile tour iceland

A subsidiary glacier of Mýrdalsjökull ice cap, Sólheimajökull is one of the most popular places in Iceland for a glacier hike. Easily accessible from the south shore route and satisfyingly ice-blue at its core, find out exactly why this glacier attracts the crowds with our complete Sólheimajökull guide.


Snorkelling and Diving in Silfra

Here’s an adventure activity completely unique to Iceland: Silfra is the only place in the world where you can scuba dive or snorkel in the gap between two continental plates. The water is crystal-clear so you can see the other-worldly rock formations that make up the Silfra hall, cathedral and lagoon. After a session of guided scuba diving in Silfra, you’ll be treated to hot chocolate and biscuits to warm up.

Pure, clear glacial water and a visibility of over 100 metres mean that snorkelling in Silfra is just as rewarding as diving. A dry suit protects you from the near-freezing water temperature and you’ll float high above the chasm between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, admiring the astonishing colours of lava solidified into mesmerising formations.
snorkeling in  silfra iceland
## Hiking in Iceland

Hitting the well-marked hiking trails that wind their way across the island rewards with breathtaking views. Immerse yourself in the kind of landscape fantasy novelists dream of. Þórsmörk is the gateway to the Icelandic Highlands, where you’ll find the awesome (in the old sense of the word) scenery the island is famous for.

Perhaps the best spot for hiking in Þórsmörk is along the Laugavegur trail, which takes three to four days, overnighting in isolated bunkhouses along the way. If you don’t have three or four days to spare, the Fimmvörðuháls trail from Þórsmörk to Skogar can be done in a single day (or two days if you want to take your time). Find more detailed information on the best hikes in iceland in this article.

If you want to experience a different kind of scenery on foot, glacier hiking in Iceland can introduce you to the Arctic-like world of ice and snow. Clamping on crampons and helmets, you can experience a hike across the frozen surface of a glacier under the guidance of a professional, who can help you avoid the hidden chasms and sinkholes concealed by snow. This article introduces five popular glacier tours in Iceland.


Explore the best hikes in Iceland


best hikes in iceland

Iceland is consistently listed among the top 10 world-class hiking destinations, with National Geographic claiming Laugavegur and Fimmvorduhals Pass one of the best long-distance hiking trails on the planet. No wonder! In this largely uninhabited country, you’ll find thousands of kilometres of well-marked walking trails on which you’ll meet next to nobody. This article guides you through the best hikes in Iceland with Icelandic Mountain Guides.


Exploring caves

Carved over aeons by the slow flow of molten lava and hidden beneath the surface of glaciers, Iceland’s caves show us why it is known as the land of ice and fire. Thirty minutes from Reykjavik, Raufarhólshellir cave (also known as The Lava Cave) is a world of ethereal colours thanks to mineral deposits in the volcanic walls.

Hollywood blockbusters have been filmed here, and the only way to experience the lava tunnel yourself is on a guided tour as the terrain is rough and the entrance has fallen in. There are a few other lava caves in Iceland, like the Víðgelmir cave in the Borgarfjörður area of West Iceland and the Þríhnúkagígur cave where you can take a lift into the magma chamber of a volcano.

On the other end of the spectrum, Iceland’s ice caves offer another kind of adventure underground. Shimmering blue and hidden beneath the frozen surface of glaciers, stepping into an ice cave is like stepping into another world. Like lava caves, ice caves need to be visited with a guide for safety reasons, so taking an ice cave tour where you are equipped with helmets and torches is the only way to discover this other-worldly scene.
ice cave in iceland

Zip-lining in Vik

For a different perspective of Iceland’s beautiful landscape, watch the glacial rivers and mossy hills from on high with a zipline adventure. Just outside the village of Vik, you’ll be harnessed up so you can soar like a bird across the rugged terrain of Iceland’s south coast along wires that are anywhere between 30 and 240 meters long.

If heights aren’t your thing, there are plenty of other sights and experiences in and around the pretty village of Vik. Take a look at our Vik village guide for inspiration.


Hit the ultimate highlights of the island with our round-up of the top 10 attractions in Iceland.


gullfoss waterfall iceland

If you are visiting for a short break, or long weekend or just want to make sure you cover the most important sights in the country, we’ve got you covered. Read our top attractions guide to discover the ten best things to see in Iceland..


Frequently Asked Questions

Is there anything fun to do in Iceland?

Iceland may be small, with a population of only around 370,00 people, but there are plenty of fun things to do across the island. Active adventures like horse riding, hiking and ziplining let you get out and experience the island in an interactive way. Then there are the pure adrenaline rushes like charging across a black-sanded beach on an ATV, shooping over the surface of a glacier on a snowmobile or diving between the continental plates which can all get your heart racing.

How many days do you need in Iceland?

For such a small island, there is so much to do in Iceland. You should consider spending at least a week here. Some people come for a long weekend, or for a few days as a stop-over between Europe and North America.

While you can hit the absolute highlights of Iceland in a couple of days – the Golden Circle, the Northern Lights and The Blue Lagoon – a full week allows you to explore a little deeper and discover the sights and adventure activities of the south shore, or the beautiful national parkland of the Snæfellsnes peninsula. You could easily fill ten days or even two weeks in Iceland, travelling around the Route One ring road around the island and hitting the multi-day hiking trails of the Highlands.

What can I do in 3 days in Iceland?

If you’re hopping on a budget flight from Europe for a long weekend in Iceland or spending just a few days to break up the journey between North America and Europe, you can hit the absolute highlights of Iceland in three days.

Basing yourself in Reykjavik and taking day tours is a great way to maximise your time. Spend a morning exploring downtown Reykjavik and perhaps hit the Blue Lagoon or take a quick ATV tour just outside Reykjavik in the afternoon. In winter, you can fit a Northern Lights tour in after dinner as they usually depart around 10pm.

One day should be dedicated to the sights of the Golden Circle, especially if it is your first trip to Iceland. In a single day from Reykjavik, you can see everything the island is famous for – thundering waterfalls, a lively geothermal park and the continental divide at Þingvellir national park. Plus, there are Golden Circle tours that include horse riding, glacier hiking or perhaps ATV riding if you want to fit another experience in.

Your final day could involve a tour of Iceland’s south shore for black-sand beaches, glacier hikes and waterfalls where rainbows float in the mist. Or, head to the Snæfellsnes peninsula in the west of Iceland for a day exploring lava caves and natural hot springs.

What is the coolest thing in Iceland?

There are loads of cool things to see and do in Iceland – did you know there is a punk museum in former public toilets in the heart of Reykjavik, for example? The coolest thing really depends on your personal interests; maybe quad biking to the wreck of a DC3 aeroplane is your bag, or zooming high above the landscape on a zipline near Vik.

If we’re talking literally, the “coolest” (in terms of temperature) thing to do in Iceland is probably exploring an ice cave or diving in the freezing water of Silfra between the continents.

Is Iceland good for adventure?

With the inland highlands punctuated by rugged mountains, 11% of the country covered in ice caps and a wild Atlantic shore all around, Iceland is the ideal spot for adventure. There are miles of hiking routes through the interior, bridle paths across lava fields for horse riding sessions, and snowmobiles and quad bikes fuelled up and ready to power you across glaciers and black-sand beaches.

Can you hike glaciers on your own in Iceland?

The answer’s a straight no. Even if you’re an experienced hiker, walking on ice is a very different skill. Our guides are highly trained and qualified to get you through the dangerous shapeshifting world of ice. Read this detailed article on Iceland's glaciers and guided glacier hikes.

What do Icelandic people like to do?

Outdoor activities are popular with Icelanders across the island. In winter, the Icelandic people enjoy cross-country skiing and spotting the Northern Lights out in the wilderness – seeing the ethereal green lights dance against the night sky never gets old.

In summer, the hiking trails of the interior open up and lacing up a pair of boots and heading out to the hills is a popular Icelandic past-time. Of course, throughout the year Icelandic people love to bathe outdoors in the geothermal hot springs. Soaking in the bath-warm water of naturally heated swimming pools and hot springs is a centuries-old tradition across the island.

So now we hope you’ve got a feel for the best activities in Iceland. If you want to quench your thirst for adventure then glacier hikes, ziplining, ATV riding and diving between the continental plates might satisfy your inner adrenaline junkie. More sedate options like horseback riding and hiking the trails through the highlands still embrace the Icelandic spirit of adventure. The beautiful thing about activities in Iceland is that they often bring you closer to the wild nature the island is famous for.

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!

Litli-Hrútur Eruption 2023 - The New Eruption near Fagradalsfjall on the Reykjanes Peninsula

Once again, the enthralling spectacle of Iceland's Reykjanes volcano is back in the limelight! After 11 months of peaceful dormancy, the volcano is now alive and kicking, treating locals and tourists to another captivating visual performance. If you've been yearning for an adventure that's truly out of this world, this might just be your calling!

Lesa blogg

What to do in Iceland- your top adventures guide

Discover Iceland’s wild side with adventures and activities that bring you close to nature

9. mars 2023

What to do in Iceland- your top adventures guide

Discover Iceland’s wild side with adventures and activities that bring you close to nature

9. mars 2023

It may be a compact nation, but the little island of Iceland is awash with activities and experiences to bring you closer to nature. From the rugged mountains of the interior to the black-sanded beaches of the Atlantic shore, Iceland’s scenery is set up for outdoor activities. Whether you’re an adrenaline junkie looking for adventure or prefer a more sedate session of horse riding, hiking and sightseeing, we have rounded up Iceland’s best activities to help you curate the ideal break to this beautiful island.

Horseback riding

While many countries across the globe offer horse riding experiences, Iceland has a pure breed of horse that makes a trail across the bridle paths a unique experience. Famously sturdy, friendly and shorter than most breeds, there’s some debate over whether or not Iceland’s horses are actually ponies. Either way, a leisurely canter on horseback over Iceland’s dramatic lava fields is a great way to spend an afternoon.

Snæfellsnes National Park has a range of places to rent horses and an other-worldly landscape to admire as you trot along. If you’re staying in Reykjavik and don’t have a lot of time, you can embark on a lava tour which includes horseback riding across solidified molten rock, just outside the capital.

Perhaps pair a session on horseback with a trip along The Golden Circle. Hit the major natural wonders of Iceland – Gulfoss waterfall, Geysir area of geothermal activity and Þingvellir national park – before taking in the scenery around Eldhestar riding centre from atop a friendly Icelandic horse.

ATV Adventures

A real adventure awaits with an ATV ride across Iceland’s distinctive scenery. Hopping on a quad bike, you can power across the black-sand beaches of south Iceland as the wild Atlantic Ocean crashes against the shore. Fording rivers and bumping across rugged terrain, you can reach the haunting DC3 plane wreck on the beach – made famous in music videos by Justin Beiber and Sigur Ros.

If you are pushed for time or you are exploring the south coast under your own steam, then an hour-long quad bike adventure might be the best option for you. You’ll get a taste of adrenaline across the jet-sanded beaches and still get to stop at the wreck of the DC3 plane for a photograph or two. Or, take it slow with a post-ATV soak in a geothermal hot spring. After an adrenaline-fuelled ride across the volcanic landscape, five minutes from The Blue Lagoon, slip into the milky blue water to soothe aching muscles.


Adrenaline junkies rejoice with a huge selection of adventure tours in Iceland to get the heart pumping.


atv tour iceland

From ziplining high above the rugged hills and rivers of Vik to hiking atop frozen glaciers, Iceland is not short of activities for the adventurous traveller. Check out our complete adventure guide to Iceland to find the daring activity for you.


Did you know you can take an ATV tour in Reykjavik itself? Just a fifteen-minute drive from the centre of the city sees you at the edge of the wilderness where you can power past beautiful Lake Hafravatn and even summit a mountain, biking up to the top of Hafrafell mountain.

The view from the top, across the Bláfjöll mountain range to steel-grey Faxaflói Bay is not to be missed. In summer, a very different experience is on offer with a midnight ATV tour. From the suburbs of Reykjavik, you depart late at night when the twilight sky is still streaked orange and gold.
Thingvellir National Park
## Snowmobiling

If you prefer your landscape a little more Arctic and frozen, then maybe a snowmobiling experience is for you. Nearly 11% of Iceland’s entire landmass is covered by ice caps and glaciers, and shooting across the frozen surface on a snowmobile is the ultimate glacier adventure. Various ice caps across the country can be seen from the seat of a snowmobile and Langjökull is the closest to Reykjavik.
Thingvellir National Park

For a full day immersed in nature, consider snowmobiling on the Golden Circle route, stopping for a heart-pumping session at Langjökull after experiencing thundering waterfalls, ravines and explosive geysers.

Plugging the active Katla volcano system, get to know Iceland’s fourth-largest ice cap with snowmobiling on Mýrdalsjökull glacier. On the south shore, this experience is ideal for those exploring the black-sand beaches, glacier lakes and other natural wonders in the area.


Discover a vast, frozen ice cap between two of Iceland’s most active volcano systems at Sólheimajökull glacier


snpwmobile tour iceland

A subsidiary glacier of Mýrdalsjökull ice cap, Sólheimajökull is one of the most popular places in Iceland for a glacier hike. Easily accessible from the south shore route and satisfyingly ice-blue at its core, find out exactly why this glacier attracts the crowds with our complete Sólheimajökull guide.


Snorkelling and Diving in Silfra

Here’s an adventure activity completely unique to Iceland: Silfra is the only place in the world where you can scuba dive or snorkel in the gap between two continental plates. The water is crystal-clear so you can see the other-worldly rock formations that make up the Silfra hall, cathedral and lagoon. After a session of guided scuba diving in Silfra, you’ll be treated to hot chocolate and biscuits to warm up.

Pure, clear glacial water and a visibility of over 100 metres mean that snorkelling in Silfra is just as rewarding as diving. A dry suit protects you from the near-freezing water temperature and you’ll float high above the chasm between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, admiring the astonishing colours of lava solidified into mesmerising formations.
snorkeling in  silfra iceland
## Hiking in Iceland

Hitting the well-marked hiking trails that wind their way across the island rewards with breathtaking views. Immerse yourself in the kind of landscape fantasy novelists dream of. Þórsmörk is the gateway to the Icelandic Highlands, where you’ll find the awesome (in the old sense of the word) scenery the island is famous for.

Perhaps the best spot for hiking in Þórsmörk is along the Laugavegur trail, which takes three to four days, overnighting in isolated bunkhouses along the way. If you don’t have three or four days to spare, the Fimmvörðuháls trail from Þórsmörk to Skogar can be done in a single day (or two days if you want to take your time). Find more detailed information on the best hikes in iceland in this article.

If you want to experience a different kind of scenery on foot, glacier hiking in Iceland can introduce you to the Arctic-like world of ice and snow. Clamping on crampons and helmets, you can experience a hike across the frozen surface of a glacier under the guidance of a professional, who can help you avoid the hidden chasms and sinkholes concealed by snow. This article introduces five popular glacier tours in Iceland.


Explore the best hikes in Iceland


best hikes in iceland

Iceland is consistently listed among the top 10 world-class hiking destinations, with National Geographic claiming Laugavegur and Fimmvorduhals Pass one of the best long-distance hiking trails on the planet. No wonder! In this largely uninhabited country, you’ll find thousands of kilometres of well-marked walking trails on which you’ll meet next to nobody. This article guides you through the best hikes in Iceland with Icelandic Mountain Guides.


Exploring caves

Carved over aeons by the slow flow of molten lava and hidden beneath the surface of glaciers, Iceland’s caves show us why it is known as the land of ice and fire. Thirty minutes from Reykjavik, Raufarhólshellir cave (also known as The Lava Cave) is a world of ethereal colours thanks to mineral deposits in the volcanic walls.

Hollywood blockbusters have been filmed here, and the only way to experience the lava tunnel yourself is on a guided tour as the terrain is rough and the entrance has fallen in. There are a few other lava caves in Iceland, like the Víðgelmir cave in the Borgarfjörður area of West Iceland and the Þríhnúkagígur cave where you can take a lift into the magma chamber of a volcano.

On the other end of the spectrum, Iceland’s ice caves offer another kind of adventure underground. Shimmering blue and hidden beneath the frozen surface of glaciers, stepping into an ice cave is like stepping into another world. Like lava caves, ice caves need to be visited with a guide for safety reasons, so taking an ice cave tour where you are equipped with helmets and torches is the only way to discover this other-worldly scene.
ice cave in iceland

Zip-lining in Vik

For a different perspective of Iceland’s beautiful landscape, watch the glacial rivers and mossy hills from on high with a zipline adventure. Just outside the village of Vik, you’ll be harnessed up so you can soar like a bird across the rugged terrain of Iceland’s south coast along wires that are anywhere between 30 and 240 meters long.

If heights aren’t your thing, there are plenty of other sights and experiences in and around the pretty village of Vik. Take a look at our Vik village guide for inspiration.


Hit the ultimate highlights of the island with our round-up of the top 10 attractions in Iceland.


gullfoss waterfall iceland

If you are visiting for a short break, or long weekend or just want to make sure you cover the most important sights in the country, we’ve got you covered. Read our top attractions guide to discover the ten best things to see in Iceland..


Frequently Asked Questions

Is there anything fun to do in Iceland?

Iceland may be small, with a population of only around 370,00 people, but there are plenty of fun things to do across the island. Active adventures like horse riding, hiking and ziplining let you get out and experience the island in an interactive way. Then there are the pure adrenaline rushes like charging across a black-sanded beach on an ATV, shooping over the surface of a glacier on a snowmobile or diving between the continental plates which can all get your heart racing.

How many days do you need in Iceland?

For such a small island, there is so much to do in Iceland. You should consider spending at least a week here. Some people come for a long weekend, or for a few days as a stop-over between Europe and North America.

While you can hit the absolute highlights of Iceland in a couple of days – the Golden Circle, the Northern Lights and The Blue Lagoon – a full week allows you to explore a little deeper and discover the sights and adventure activities of the south shore, or the beautiful national parkland of the Snæfellsnes peninsula. You could easily fill ten days or even two weeks in Iceland, travelling around the Route One ring road around the island and hitting the multi-day hiking trails of the Highlands.

What can I do in 3 days in Iceland?

If you’re hopping on a budget flight from Europe for a long weekend in Iceland or spending just a few days to break up the journey between North America and Europe, you can hit the absolute highlights of Iceland in three days.

Basing yourself in Reykjavik and taking day tours is a great way to maximise your time. Spend a morning exploring downtown Reykjavik and perhaps hit the Blue Lagoon or take a quick ATV tour just outside Reykjavik in the afternoon. In winter, you can fit a Northern Lights tour in after dinner as they usually depart around 10pm.

One day should be dedicated to the sights of the Golden Circle, especially if it is your first trip to Iceland. In a single day from Reykjavik, you can see everything the island is famous for – thundering waterfalls, a lively geothermal park and the continental divide at Þingvellir national park. Plus, there are Golden Circle tours that include horse riding, glacier hiking or perhaps ATV riding if you want to fit another experience in.

Your final day could involve a tour of Iceland’s south shore for black-sand beaches, glacier hikes and waterfalls where rainbows float in the mist. Or, head to the Snæfellsnes peninsula in the west of Iceland for a day exploring lava caves and natural hot springs.

What is the coolest thing in Iceland?

There are loads of cool things to see and do in Iceland – did you know there is a punk museum in former public toilets in the heart of Reykjavik, for example? The coolest thing really depends on your personal interests; maybe quad biking to the wreck of a DC3 aeroplane is your bag, or zooming high above the landscape on a zipline near Vik.

If we’re talking literally, the “coolest” (in terms of temperature) thing to do in Iceland is probably exploring an ice cave or diving in the freezing water of Silfra between the continents.

Is Iceland good for adventure?

With the inland highlands punctuated by rugged mountains, 11% of the country covered in ice caps and a wild Atlantic shore all around, Iceland is the ideal spot for adventure. There are miles of hiking routes through the interior, bridle paths across lava fields for horse riding sessions, and snowmobiles and quad bikes fuelled up and ready to power you across glaciers and black-sand beaches.

Can you hike glaciers on your own in Iceland?

The answer’s a straight no. Even if you’re an experienced hiker, walking on ice is a very different skill. Our guides are highly trained and qualified to get you through the dangerous shapeshifting world of ice. Read this detailed article on Iceland's glaciers and guided glacier hikes.

What do Icelandic people like to do?

Outdoor activities are popular with Icelanders across the island. In winter, the Icelandic people enjoy cross-country skiing and spotting the Northern Lights out in the wilderness – seeing the ethereal green lights dance against the night sky never gets old.

In summer, the hiking trails of the interior open up and lacing up a pair of boots and heading out to the hills is a popular Icelandic past-time. Of course, throughout the year Icelandic people love to bathe outdoors in the geothermal hot springs. Soaking in the bath-warm water of naturally heated swimming pools and hot springs is a centuries-old tradition across the island.

So now we hope you’ve got a feel for the best activities in Iceland. If you want to quench your thirst for adventure then glacier hikes, ziplining, ATV riding and diving between the continental plates might satisfy your inner adrenaline junkie. More sedate options like horseback riding and hiking the trails through the highlands still embrace the Icelandic spirit of adventure. The beautiful thing about activities in Iceland is that they often bring you closer to the wild nature the island is famous for.

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!