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What to do when you Hop Off – At Stop 1

Sightseeing around Harpa Concert Hall

8. apríl 2020

What to do when you Hop Off – At Stop 1

Sightseeing around Harpa Concert Hall

8. apríl 2020

So you’ve decided to get acquainted with Reykjavik through our Hop On – Hop Off bus. Well done, we commend you for your good judgement. Here’s a short guide to what you might want to check out around stop 1.

Harpa

The concert hall and conference centre is Reykjavik’s latest landmark. This showstopper of a building is home to both the Iceland Symphony Orchestra and the Icelandic Opera and a popular venue for all kinds of festivals, concerts and conferences. If their program doesn’t suit you, it’s still worth roaming these halls for the architecture and the views over the old harbour. Make sure you check out this unique geometric glass facade at night for the light show.

Sæbraut Walkway

Walk along the seafront to experience the views of the bay and Mt. Esja as well as the iconic Sun Voyager sculpture. This walkway highlights Reykjavik’s best attributes, the fresh ocean air and mountain views and the closeness to both untouched nature and the lively downtown area.

Arnarhóll

This hill is a natural auditorium and a favourite for outdoor public concerts and events. It’s where Icelanders gather to celebrate their football team coming home from the European Cup with a Viking clap, where they end their Pride march with a huge concer and where they gather in huge numbers to witness the annual fireworks display on Culture Night in August. The statue at the top of the hill is of Ingólfur Arnarson, the icon of early Viking settlers in Iceland. The scary looking building north of it is the Central Bank of Iceland where they control the world’s smallest currency, the Icelandic króna.

The Culture House

This exhibition space is part of the National Museum of Iceland and houses a permanent exhibition on Icelandic culture. The exhibition titled Points of View draws from multiple cultural institutions to display a cross cut of what it means to be Icelandic. It is well worth a visit for a sneak peek at the Icelandic psyche.

Hverfisgata Street

Running parallel to the popular Laugavegur shopping street is the lesser known Hverfisgata. The street takes you between Arnarhóll and the Hlemmur bus terminal and has an entirely different feel than the more bustling Laugavegur. Check out the streets various cafés, restaurants and shops and don’t miss the eclectic mixture of stately buildings and cute colourful houses. Cinema Bíó Paradís is a favourite for indie film enthusiasts and the National Theatre is an architectural world of its own.

REYKJAVIK CITY BLOG

Drinks are on us!

Did you know that Iceland has some of the purest tap water in the world?

What to do when you Hop Off – At Stop 1

Sightseeing around Harpa Concert Hall

8. apríl 2020

What to do when you Hop Off – At Stop 1

Sightseeing around Harpa Concert Hall

8. apríl 2020

So you’ve decided to get acquainted with Reykjavik through our Hop On – Hop Off bus. Well done, we commend you for your good judgement. Here’s a short guide to what you might want to check out around stop 1.

Harpa

The concert hall and conference centre is Reykjavik’s latest landmark. This showstopper of a building is home to both the Iceland Symphony Orchestra and the Icelandic Opera and a popular venue for all kinds of festivals, concerts and conferences. If their program doesn’t suit you, it’s still worth roaming these halls for the architecture and the views over the old harbour. Make sure you check out this unique geometric glass facade at night for the light show.

Sæbraut Walkway

Walk along the seafront to experience the views of the bay and Mt. Esja as well as the iconic Sun Voyager sculpture. This walkway highlights Reykjavik’s best attributes, the fresh ocean air and mountain views and the closeness to both untouched nature and the lively downtown area.

Arnarhóll

This hill is a natural auditorium and a favourite for outdoor public concerts and events. It’s where Icelanders gather to celebrate their football team coming home from the European Cup with a Viking clap, where they end their Pride march with a huge concer and where they gather in huge numbers to witness the annual fireworks display on Culture Night in August. The statue at the top of the hill is of Ingólfur Arnarson, the icon of early Viking settlers in Iceland. The scary looking building north of it is the Central Bank of Iceland where they control the world’s smallest currency, the Icelandic króna.

The Culture House

This exhibition space is part of the National Museum of Iceland and houses a permanent exhibition on Icelandic culture. The exhibition titled Points of View draws from multiple cultural institutions to display a cross cut of what it means to be Icelandic. It is well worth a visit for a sneak peek at the Icelandic psyche.

Hverfisgata Street

Running parallel to the popular Laugavegur shopping street is the lesser known Hverfisgata. The street takes you between Arnarhóll and the Hlemmur bus terminal and has an entirely different feel than the more bustling Laugavegur. Check out the streets various cafés, restaurants and shops and don’t miss the eclectic mixture of stately buildings and cute colourful houses. Cinema Bíó Paradís is a favourite for indie film enthusiasts and the National Theatre is an architectural world of its own.

Harpa í Reykjavík
NationalTheatre
SunVoyager

REYKJAVIK CITY BLOG

Drinks are on us!

Did you know that Iceland has some of the purest tap water in the world?