Your Ultimate Guide to Guide to Geysir, Iceland: All You Need to Know

2. nóvember 2022

Your Ultimate Guide to Guide to Geysir, Iceland: All You Need to Know

2. nóvember 2022

The Great Geysir, or often simply Geysir, is truly a must-see on any trip to Iceland. It’s not just because of its awesome power and captivating display—although that might well be enough. But it’s also due to its crucial role in the history of geology. Combined these facts make for an unforgettable destination. Read on to find out why the place holds such a fascination—and how you can visit for yourself. While you’re here, discover the best tours to see Geysir in Iceland too.

What is the Geysir in Iceland?

The Geysir, Iceland, is one of the most impressive geological sights in the country, among tough competition. It’s where visitors can see the power of the earth’s geothermal activity up close.

A geyser is a phenomenon where water is dramatically ejected from below the surface of the earth. It’s a type of spring, but not one where you can enjoy a tranquil bath. Rather, geysers are known for their violent eruptions that can fire water high into the sky.

Iceland’s Great Geysir is the place that originally gave this phenomenon its name. That’s because it was the first geyser to be known by Europeans, as far back as 800 years ago, when eruptions were actually much higher and much more frequent. That’s why, when you come to Geysir, you’re walking in an important historic place—not just in the site of an incredible geological display.

Today, the geyser fires water up into the sky to a height of about 70 metres (230 feet). However, in recent decades it has become a little unreliable. You’ll be very lucky if you witness an eruption for yourself.

Yet, as you’ll discover, Geysir—whose name means something like “the one who gushes”—is not the only geothermal wonder in the area. Here in the larger Geysir Geothermal Area, you’ll find other geysers—such as Strokkur—as well as fumaroles, hot springs, and more.

Explore the Geothermal Area on Iceland’s Golden Circle, probably the most famous travel itinerary in Iceland. Discover more about this favourite site below.

The history of Geysir

Today, Geysir is known as one of the most compelling sights in all of Iceland. And in truth, it’s been that way for years, if not centuries. As early as the 18th century scientists and curious visitors were coming to the site, but the area likely held fascination long before that too.

In fact, recent investigations have shown that Geysir has been active for at least 10,000 years. And the site has definitely been known about since at least 1294, when dramatic earthquakes caused new springs to form in the area.

It’s said that Geysir once erupted with a much more powerful force. Reports suggest that back in the 19th century, its waters would reach up to 170 metres (560 feet) high. In the year 2000, some eruptions caused the water to reach 122 metres (400 feet). However, such heights haven’t been seen since.

What’s particularly interesting is that Geysir’s periods of intense activity often come at times just after large earthquakes—and then tend to subside afterwards. Historical sources suggest that once upon a time, Geysir’s eruptions were so strong that they made the earth tremble.

These days, the Great Geysir is less reliable, occasionally erupting with great power, but usually not doing very much at all. Luckily, though, there are other geysers to keep you entertained.

Strokkur geyser and other sights in the Geothermal Area

After Geysir itself, Strokkur is the most impressive geyser in the geothermal area. It doesn’t quite reach the heights of Geysir in its prime, but it’s an incredible display nonetheless. The waters of Strokkur often reach over 40 metres (131 feet).

What’s more, Strokkur is more regular, erupting every 5 to 10 minutes. Each gushing torrent of water is accompanied by the gasps and cheers of the surrounding crowds. And for good reason: it’s a euphoric collective experience.

However, that’s not the only sight you can witness here in the Geothermal Area. To begin with, there are other geysers—including the spellbinding Smiður and Litli-Strokkur, both smaller than Strokkur but no less charming.

Then, notably, there are the fumaroles, bubbling holes in the ground releasing steam and other gases. They’re not just for geology nerds. Rather, these steaming cavities give you an insight into what’s happening beneath the surface of the earth.

Geysir and the Golden Circle


geysir 14

The Geysir Geothermal Area sits on the Golden Circle, probably the best-known travel itinerary in Iceland. Also including Gullfoss Waterfall and Þingvellir National Park, the Golden Circle takes you through the most important historical and scenic sights in the south of the country. If you have only limited time in Iceland, this is the itinerary you should choose.

You’ll see why for yourself. Gullfoss Waterfall, with its powerful torrent of glacial water that surges through the canyon, is simply astonishing in its drama. By some estimates, it’s the largest waterfall in Europe by volume. It’s definitely up there among the most beautiful.

Then there’s Þingvellir National Park. This was the site of Iceland’s original parliament, the Þingvellir, which was formed here back in the year 930 to become the oldest continual parliament in the world. It’s no exaggeration to say that you’re walking in the footsteps of history.

Yet that’s not the only thing to see at Þingvellir. For example, you can explore the fissure between two continents. Or, if you’re brave enough, dive into Silfra, the intercontinental canyon at the heart of the Þingvallatn Lake. It’s said to have the clearest waters in the world.


Visiting Geysir and the Geothermal Park

The captivating power of Geysir and Strokkur await in the Geothermal Area. But what do you need to know before you get there? Here we have some tips so you can best prepare your visit.

Where are Geysir and Strokkur located?

Geysir and Strokkur are located in the Geysir Geothermal Area, in the valley known as Haukadalur Valley in South Iceland. It’s a short distance from the foot of the glacier, Langjökull.

The area is about 1.5 hours from downtown Reykjavik by road, travelling toward Iceland’s Highlands, making it really easy to reach by car or coach.

How to get to Geysir?

Most visitors to Iceland reach Geysir using one of two options. Ultimately, the choice is yours.

Firstly, many choose to hire a car and make the journey themselves. This has its perks, including the freedom to travel on your own schedule and decide for yourself how long to spend at Geysir. However, it does come with its disadvantages, including the fact that in winter the roads can be a little difficult to navigate if you’re not experienced in Icelandic conditions.

Alternatively, you can join a tour. These will take the stress out of the travel, while offering added extras, including an expert guide and trips to nearby sights, so you can get a full experience.

Whichever way you choose to visit, we recommend you add Þingvellir and Gullfoss to your trip to Geysir—so you can enjoy the full Golden Circle experience.

How much time do you need at Geysir Iceland?

Most people recommend spending at least an hour at Geysir, so that you can see all of the geothermal displays that the area has to offer. However, for the keen visitor, the area can reward much longer.

In fact, if you have the time to spare, we recommend that you take a longer walk into the Haukadalur Valley. Even if the geysers weren’t here, you’d still be in an incredibly beautiful place.

Facilities at the Geysir Geothermal Area

At Geysir, you’ll find plenty of facilities to make your visit comfortable. Alongside free parking and separate coach parking, there are toilets and even a campsite and plenty of hotels.

You’ll also find a restaurant, shop, and a golf course at the nearby Geysir Centre.


Natural springs and hot water in Iceland


Sky lagoon

They might be the most spectacular sight, but geysers are not the only incredible feature of Iceland’s geothermal activity. Thanks to the country’s subterranean heating system—i.e. active volcanic processes—you can enjoy other amazing experiences too.

Imagine bathing in a natural warm river, or taking a dip in the wild pools in the heart of the Icelandic highlands. More mundanely, but perhaps no less impressive, consider showering at home beneath water heated by the power of the earth.

In Iceland, all this is possible. And besides offering the tranquil beauty of the hot springs, all this hot water gives Iceland one of the most sustainable energy systems in the world too.

  • Find out more: Hot Water in Iceland: Your Complete Guide


What is the best time of year to visit the Geysir Geothermal Area?

Like most of the other incredible sights on Iceland’s south coast, there’s no best time to visit Geysir. During both the bright nights of Icelandic summer, and the short days of winter, when snow fills the Haukadalur valley, this remains a spectacular place.

Geysir is open all year round and rewards a visit whenever you come to explore. The only thing to consider is the weather.

See Geysir in the summer

Visiting the Geysir Geothermal Area in summer is simply a joy. Temperatures are comfortable—sometimes even above 20°C (68°F)—and the snows are likely to have disappeared completely.

Meanwhile, the longer days of summer allow for longer visiting hours. In fact, visiting the area at night is a special, mystical experience. As you might expect, visitor numbers are higher in the summer, but this won’t affect the wonder of the experience. It’s a delight to behold Strokkur’s dramatic eruptions nonetheless.

Visit Geysir in winter

The mood of the Geothermal Area changes during the winter. The ground is typically white and the cold air adds a wild element to the area. What doesn’t change is Strokkur’s incredible spurts of water.

Arriving at Geysir in late winter morning as the sun comes up can be one of the best times to photograph the waters of the geysers. The light is tranquil and muted, offering a softer backdrop to the violence of the eruptions.

Watch out though. Driving yourself to the site in winter can be difficult, with dark skies and unpredictable weather. Many visitors prefer to take a bus during this time.

Obviously, don’t forget to wrap up warm. Even though the waters of Strokkur are warm, there’s no doubt you’ll feel the cold.


Spa experiences in Iceland


Blue lagoon

The same power that heats the waters of Geysir also makes one of Iceland’s most famous experiences possible. Geothermal energy warms the waters of spas and pools across the country, offering Icelanders and visitors the perfect places to relax.

Probably the most famous is the Blue Lagoon, whose mineral-rich waters are thought to have therapeutic qualities. Its name comes from the blue appearance of the water, caused by the silt at the bottom of the pool.

The newest addition to Iceland’s range of spas is the Sky Lagoon. Only a stone’s throw from downtown Reykjavik, here you can enjoy the spa’s heated waters while overlooking the wild waves of the Atlantic Ocean.

Wherever you are in Iceland, there are many more spas to choose from—including Geosea in Húsavík or the dramatic Giljaböð, the Húsafell Mountains Baths. - Find out more: Hot Springs & Geothermal Pools in Iceland: Your Guide


FAQs about the Geysir Geothermal Area

Want to know more about Geysir and the surrounding area? Here, we answer some of your most frequently asked questions.

How often does Geysir in Iceland erupt?

Once upon a time, Geysir would erupt frequently—often as regularly as every 3 hours. However, the Great Geysir is no longer as reliable as it once was. While it’s still technically active, it erupted last in 2016 and before that only in 2000.

However, this can change. Typically, eruptions tend to happen after earthquakes. If there’s one soon, Geysir may become more regular again.

How often does Strokkur in Iceland erupt?

Unlike its more famous counterpart, Strokkur erupts regularly. We’re talking every 5-10 minutes. Not every eruption is equal in size, but they can reach up to 40 metres high. If you only see a small burst, wait for the next eruption, which will likely be much larger.

How deep is the Geysir in Iceland?

When it’s not erupting, Geysir is a circular pool. This pool is 1.2 metres deep (about 4 feet) and 18 metres in diameter (60 feet). However, the cavities that feed the geyser are much much deeper, stretching down far into the crust of the earth.

Can you swim in Geysir?

No, you cannot swim in Geysir—and nor would you want to. The waters of the pool—and that of the other geysers in the area—are hot enough to burn you. Please don’t try it!

Do you have to pay to see the Geysir in Iceland?

No, you do not have to pay to see the Geysir in Iceland. Entrance to the area is free and there is no charge for the car park.

Can you see Geysir at night?

The Geothermal Area is open 24 hours a day, meaning that you can see Geysir at night too. In fact, some visitors suggest that the best time to visit is late in the evening, when the sun is just about to set.

Tours of Geysir and other attractions

Whenever you want to visit the incredible display of the geysers, at Reykjavik Excursions we can help. Throughout the year, we run tour packages that can take you to all of the most impressive sights across southern Iceland and the south coast.

The Golden Circle direct is our classic tour of Iceland’s most famous itinerary, taking in the Geysir area, Gullfoss Waterfall, and Þingvellir National Park. It’s an unforgettable day out. But you can visit the Geysir on any of our tours of the Golden Circle, including:

Langjökull and Golden Circle tour

Geysir sits just below the imposing glacier known as Langjökull. On a combined tour, you can see all of the sights of the Golden Circle and explore the glacier by monster truck. Alternatively, visit the glacier by snowmobile. - Book your tickets: Golden Circle and Langjökull tour

Friðheimar

A short distance from Geysir is one of the most surprising places in southern Iceland: Friðheimar, a greenhouse and restaurant in which ingredients are grown with geothermal heat. It’s an incredible way to see how Icelanders have put geothermal activity to innovative use.

Lava Tunnel

At Geysir, you’ll see how geothermal energy forces hot water out into the world above ground. But you can get a different perspective on these amazing natural processes by venturing below the surface of the earth yourself. That’s what you can do at the Lava Tunnel at Raufarhólshellir. In places reaching 30 metres wide (98 feet), this tunnel is thousands of years old and testament to the power of volcanic activity.

Laugarvatn Fontana Geothermal Spa

After a long day exploring the Golden Circle, why not unwind in the warm waters of a geothermal spa? Laugarvatn Fontana is one of the most luxurious spa locations close to Geysir, and it’s the perfect way to bring your journey to a close. - Book your tickets here: Laugarvatn Fontana Geothermal Spa and Golden Circle

Visit Geysir for yourself with Reykjavik Excursions

At Geysir, all manner of wonders await. And when joining a tour with Reykjavik Excursions, you can enjoy all that this amazing place offers in comfort and hassle-free.

Whichever tour you choose, we’ll ensure your journey is easy, packed with expert information, and full of the joys of authentic travel. We run the vast majority of our tours all year round, so we’re a reliable presence across the south of Iceland whichever season you visit.

Alternatively, if a group tour is not for you, we can help you organise custom trips that give you exactly what you want from your stay in Iceland—whether that’s private tours or group visits.

GOLDEN CIRCLE BLOG

Your Top 15 Must-See Places Around Iceland

Volcanic peaks, Europe’s largest glaciers, and otherworldly coastlines—Iceland is home to some of the most captivating landscapes in the world. And on a trip to Iceland, you’ll experience some of these awesome sights for yourself.

Your Ultimate Guide to Guide to Geysir, Iceland: All You Need to Know

2. nóvember 2022

Your Ultimate Guide to Guide to Geysir, Iceland: All You Need to Know

2. nóvember 2022

The Great Geysir, or often simply Geysir, is truly a must-see on any trip to Iceland. It’s not just because of its awesome power and captivating display—although that might well be enough. But it’s also due to its crucial role in the history of geology. Combined these facts make for an unforgettable destination. Read on to find out why the place holds such a fascination—and how you can visit for yourself. While you’re here, discover the best tours to see Geysir in Iceland too.

What is the Geysir in Iceland?

The Geysir, Iceland, is one of the most impressive geological sights in the country, among tough competition. It’s where visitors can see the power of the earth’s geothermal activity up close.

A geyser is a phenomenon where water is dramatically ejected from below the surface of the earth. It’s a type of spring, but not one where you can enjoy a tranquil bath. Rather, geysers are known for their violent eruptions that can fire water high into the sky.

Iceland’s Great Geysir is the place that originally gave this phenomenon its name. That’s because it was the first geyser to be known by Europeans, as far back as 800 years ago, when eruptions were actually much higher and much more frequent. That’s why, when you come to Geysir, you’re walking in an important historic place—not just in the site of an incredible geological display.

Today, the geyser fires water up into the sky to a height of about 70 metres (230 feet). However, in recent decades it has become a little unreliable. You’ll be very lucky if you witness an eruption for yourself.

Yet, as you’ll discover, Geysir—whose name means something like “the one who gushes”—is not the only geothermal wonder in the area. Here in the larger Geysir Geothermal Area, you’ll find other geysers—such as Strokkur—as well as fumaroles, hot springs, and more.

Explore the Geothermal Area on Iceland’s Golden Circle, probably the most famous travel itinerary in Iceland. Discover more about this favourite site below.

The history of Geysir

Today, Geysir is known as one of the most compelling sights in all of Iceland. And in truth, it’s been that way for years, if not centuries. As early as the 18th century scientists and curious visitors were coming to the site, but the area likely held fascination long before that too.

In fact, recent investigations have shown that Geysir has been active for at least 10,000 years. And the site has definitely been known about since at least 1294, when dramatic earthquakes caused new springs to form in the area.

It’s said that Geysir once erupted with a much more powerful force. Reports suggest that back in the 19th century, its waters would reach up to 170 metres (560 feet) high. In the year 2000, some eruptions caused the water to reach 122 metres (400 feet). However, such heights haven’t been seen since.

What’s particularly interesting is that Geysir’s periods of intense activity often come at times just after large earthquakes—and then tend to subside afterwards. Historical sources suggest that once upon a time, Geysir’s eruptions were so strong that they made the earth tremble.

These days, the Great Geysir is less reliable, occasionally erupting with great power, but usually not doing very much at all. Luckily, though, there are other geysers to keep you entertained.

Strokkur geyser and other sights in the Geothermal Area

After Geysir itself, Strokkur is the most impressive geyser in the geothermal area. It doesn’t quite reach the heights of Geysir in its prime, but it’s an incredible display nonetheless. The waters of Strokkur often reach over 40 metres (131 feet).

What’s more, Strokkur is more regular, erupting every 5 to 10 minutes. Each gushing torrent of water is accompanied by the gasps and cheers of the surrounding crowds. And for good reason: it’s a euphoric collective experience.

However, that’s not the only sight you can witness here in the Geothermal Area. To begin with, there are other geysers—including the spellbinding Smiður and Litli-Strokkur, both smaller than Strokkur but no less charming.

Then, notably, there are the fumaroles, bubbling holes in the ground releasing steam and other gases. They’re not just for geology nerds. Rather, these steaming cavities give you an insight into what’s happening beneath the surface of the earth.

Geysir and the Golden Circle


geysir 14

The Geysir Geothermal Area sits on the Golden Circle, probably the best-known travel itinerary in Iceland. Also including Gullfoss Waterfall and Þingvellir National Park, the Golden Circle takes you through the most important historical and scenic sights in the south of the country. If you have only limited time in Iceland, this is the itinerary you should choose.

You’ll see why for yourself. Gullfoss Waterfall, with its powerful torrent of glacial water that surges through the canyon, is simply astonishing in its drama. By some estimates, it’s the largest waterfall in Europe by volume. It’s definitely up there among the most beautiful.

Then there’s Þingvellir National Park. This was the site of Iceland’s original parliament, the Þingvellir, which was formed here back in the year 930 to become the oldest continual parliament in the world. It’s no exaggeration to say that you’re walking in the footsteps of history.

Yet that’s not the only thing to see at Þingvellir. For example, you can explore the fissure between two continents. Or, if you’re brave enough, dive into Silfra, the intercontinental canyon at the heart of the Þingvallatn Lake. It’s said to have the clearest waters in the world.


Visiting Geysir and the Geothermal Park

The captivating power of Geysir and Strokkur await in the Geothermal Area. But what do you need to know before you get there? Here we have some tips so you can best prepare your visit.

Where are Geysir and Strokkur located?

Geysir and Strokkur are located in the Geysir Geothermal Area, in the valley known as Haukadalur Valley in South Iceland. It’s a short distance from the foot of the glacier, Langjökull.

The area is about 1.5 hours from downtown Reykjavik by road, travelling toward Iceland’s Highlands, making it really easy to reach by car or coach.

How to get to Geysir?

Most visitors to Iceland reach Geysir using one of two options. Ultimately, the choice is yours.

Firstly, many choose to hire a car and make the journey themselves. This has its perks, including the freedom to travel on your own schedule and decide for yourself how long to spend at Geysir. However, it does come with its disadvantages, including the fact that in winter the roads can be a little difficult to navigate if you’re not experienced in Icelandic conditions.

Alternatively, you can join a tour. These will take the stress out of the travel, while offering added extras, including an expert guide and trips to nearby sights, so you can get a full experience.

Whichever way you choose to visit, we recommend you add Þingvellir and Gullfoss to your trip to Geysir—so you can enjoy the full Golden Circle experience.

How much time do you need at Geysir Iceland?

Most people recommend spending at least an hour at Geysir, so that you can see all of the geothermal displays that the area has to offer. However, for the keen visitor, the area can reward much longer.

In fact, if you have the time to spare, we recommend that you take a longer walk into the Haukadalur Valley. Even if the geysers weren’t here, you’d still be in an incredibly beautiful place.

Facilities at the Geysir Geothermal Area

At Geysir, you’ll find plenty of facilities to make your visit comfortable. Alongside free parking and separate coach parking, there are toilets and even a campsite and plenty of hotels.

You’ll also find a restaurant, shop, and a golf course at the nearby Geysir Centre.


Natural springs and hot water in Iceland


Sky lagoon

They might be the most spectacular sight, but geysers are not the only incredible feature of Iceland’s geothermal activity. Thanks to the country’s subterranean heating system—i.e. active volcanic processes—you can enjoy other amazing experiences too.

Imagine bathing in a natural warm river, or taking a dip in the wild pools in the heart of the Icelandic highlands. More mundanely, but perhaps no less impressive, consider showering at home beneath water heated by the power of the earth.

In Iceland, all this is possible. And besides offering the tranquil beauty of the hot springs, all this hot water gives Iceland one of the most sustainable energy systems in the world too.

  • Find out more: Hot Water in Iceland: Your Complete Guide


What is the best time of year to visit the Geysir Geothermal Area?

Like most of the other incredible sights on Iceland’s south coast, there’s no best time to visit Geysir. During both the bright nights of Icelandic summer, and the short days of winter, when snow fills the Haukadalur valley, this remains a spectacular place.

Geysir is open all year round and rewards a visit whenever you come to explore. The only thing to consider is the weather.

See Geysir in the summer

Visiting the Geysir Geothermal Area in summer is simply a joy. Temperatures are comfortable—sometimes even above 20°C (68°F)—and the snows are likely to have disappeared completely.

Meanwhile, the longer days of summer allow for longer visiting hours. In fact, visiting the area at night is a special, mystical experience. As you might expect, visitor numbers are higher in the summer, but this won’t affect the wonder of the experience. It’s a delight to behold Strokkur’s dramatic eruptions nonetheless.

Visit Geysir in winter

The mood of the Geothermal Area changes during the winter. The ground is typically white and the cold air adds a wild element to the area. What doesn’t change is Strokkur’s incredible spurts of water.

Arriving at Geysir in late winter morning as the sun comes up can be one of the best times to photograph the waters of the geysers. The light is tranquil and muted, offering a softer backdrop to the violence of the eruptions.

Watch out though. Driving yourself to the site in winter can be difficult, with dark skies and unpredictable weather. Many visitors prefer to take a bus during this time.

Obviously, don’t forget to wrap up warm. Even though the waters of Strokkur are warm, there’s no doubt you’ll feel the cold.


Spa experiences in Iceland


Blue lagoon

The same power that heats the waters of Geysir also makes one of Iceland’s most famous experiences possible. Geothermal energy warms the waters of spas and pools across the country, offering Icelanders and visitors the perfect places to relax.

Probably the most famous is the Blue Lagoon, whose mineral-rich waters are thought to have therapeutic qualities. Its name comes from the blue appearance of the water, caused by the silt at the bottom of the pool.

The newest addition to Iceland’s range of spas is the Sky Lagoon. Only a stone’s throw from downtown Reykjavik, here you can enjoy the spa’s heated waters while overlooking the wild waves of the Atlantic Ocean.

Wherever you are in Iceland, there are many more spas to choose from—including Geosea in Húsavík or the dramatic Giljaböð, the Húsafell Mountains Baths. - Find out more: Hot Springs & Geothermal Pools in Iceland: Your Guide


FAQs about the Geysir Geothermal Area

Want to know more about Geysir and the surrounding area? Here, we answer some of your most frequently asked questions.

How often does Geysir in Iceland erupt?

Once upon a time, Geysir would erupt frequently—often as regularly as every 3 hours. However, the Great Geysir is no longer as reliable as it once was. While it’s still technically active, it erupted last in 2016 and before that only in 2000.

However, this can change. Typically, eruptions tend to happen after earthquakes. If there’s one soon, Geysir may become more regular again.

How often does Strokkur in Iceland erupt?

Unlike its more famous counterpart, Strokkur erupts regularly. We’re talking every 5-10 minutes. Not every eruption is equal in size, but they can reach up to 40 metres high. If you only see a small burst, wait for the next eruption, which will likely be much larger.

How deep is the Geysir in Iceland?

When it’s not erupting, Geysir is a circular pool. This pool is 1.2 metres deep (about 4 feet) and 18 metres in diameter (60 feet). However, the cavities that feed the geyser are much much deeper, stretching down far into the crust of the earth.

Can you swim in Geysir?

No, you cannot swim in Geysir—and nor would you want to. The waters of the pool—and that of the other geysers in the area—are hot enough to burn you. Please don’t try it!

Do you have to pay to see the Geysir in Iceland?

No, you do not have to pay to see the Geysir in Iceland. Entrance to the area is free and there is no charge for the car park.

Can you see Geysir at night?

The Geothermal Area is open 24 hours a day, meaning that you can see Geysir at night too. In fact, some visitors suggest that the best time to visit is late in the evening, when the sun is just about to set.

Tours of Geysir and other attractions

Whenever you want to visit the incredible display of the geysers, at Reykjavik Excursions we can help. Throughout the year, we run tour packages that can take you to all of the most impressive sights across southern Iceland and the south coast.

The Golden Circle direct is our classic tour of Iceland’s most famous itinerary, taking in the Geysir area, Gullfoss Waterfall, and Þingvellir National Park. It’s an unforgettable day out. But you can visit the Geysir on any of our tours of the Golden Circle, including:

Langjökull and Golden Circle tour

Geysir sits just below the imposing glacier known as Langjökull. On a combined tour, you can see all of the sights of the Golden Circle and explore the glacier by monster truck. Alternatively, visit the glacier by snowmobile. - Book your tickets: Golden Circle and Langjökull tour

Friðheimar

A short distance from Geysir is one of the most surprising places in southern Iceland: Friðheimar, a greenhouse and restaurant in which ingredients are grown with geothermal heat. It’s an incredible way to see how Icelanders have put geothermal activity to innovative use.

Lava Tunnel

At Geysir, you’ll see how geothermal energy forces hot water out into the world above ground. But you can get a different perspective on these amazing natural processes by venturing below the surface of the earth yourself. That’s what you can do at the Lava Tunnel at Raufarhólshellir. In places reaching 30 metres wide (98 feet), this tunnel is thousands of years old and testament to the power of volcanic activity.

Laugarvatn Fontana Geothermal Spa

After a long day exploring the Golden Circle, why not unwind in the warm waters of a geothermal spa? Laugarvatn Fontana is one of the most luxurious spa locations close to Geysir, and it’s the perfect way to bring your journey to a close. - Book your tickets here: Laugarvatn Fontana Geothermal Spa and Golden Circle

Visit Geysir for yourself with Reykjavik Excursions

At Geysir, all manner of wonders await. And when joining a tour with Reykjavik Excursions, you can enjoy all that this amazing place offers in comfort and hassle-free.

Whichever tour you choose, we’ll ensure your journey is easy, packed with expert information, and full of the joys of authentic travel. We run the vast majority of our tours all year round, so we’re a reliable presence across the south of Iceland whichever season you visit.

Alternatively, if a group tour is not for you, we can help you organise custom trips that give you exactly what you want from your stay in Iceland—whether that’s private tours or group visits.

GOLDEN CIRCLE BLOG

Your Top 15 Must-See Places Around Iceland

Volcanic peaks, Europe’s largest glaciers, and otherworldly coastlines—Iceland is home to some of the most captivating landscapes in the world. And on a trip to Iceland, you’ll experience some of these awesome sights for yourself.