Things to Do in Reykjavik: Your Guide to the Main Attractions and Activities

May 3, 2022

Things to Do in Reykjavik: Your Guide to the Main Attractions and Activities

May 3, 2022

Reykjavik is the world’s most northerly capital city—but there’s so much more to it than its remote location. With its buzzing cultural scene, a picturesque coastal setting, and an incredible range of unique activities, Iceland’s capital really has a lot to offer.

In this guide, you’ll discover some of the most exciting things to do in Reykjavik—including nature and culture, nightlife and cuisine. And we’ll give you some practical tips on how to get around the city too.

Read on to find out what this magical city has in store. Then check out our Reykjavik tours to start exploring for yourself.

What is Reykjavik like?

The country’s biggest city and its administrative, cultural, and political heart, Reykjavik is a must-see for any visitor to Iceland. No matter what your plans are for your trip to the Land of Fire and Ice, you won’t want to miss a few days in the capital.

While Reykjavik is a small town by many countries’ standards—with a population of just over 120,000—it punches well above its weight in terms of the sights and adventures it offers. In few other cities will you find this intoxicating mix of contemporary art and culture, historical destinations, and natural wonder.

Founded in the 9th century, Reykjavik—actually meaning something like “Smokey Bay”—is thought to be the location of Iceland’s first permanent settlement. But it remained a fishing village for most of the following millennium. It wasn’t until the 20th century that it was finally made the capital.

Today, Reykjavik is cosmopolitan, vibrant, and proud of its unique heritage. On your visit, you’ll find out why it really has a lot to be proud of.

How to get to Reykjavik

Iceland is, of course, an island—and one that’s nearly 300 kilometres (186 miles) from its closest neighbour, Greenland. That means that options for arriving in its capital city are quite limited.

Most likely, if you’re visiting Reykjavik from the US or Europe, you’ll arrive at the Keflavik International Airport. It’s about 50 kilometres (31 miles) from the city centre, which you can reach by road in about 40 minutes.

While you can pay more for a taxi, we recommend taking the Flybus Airport Transfer, which runs every two hours between the airport and downtown Reykjavik.

For adventurous visitors, there’s also the chance to take a cruise to Iceland too, typically from the Faroe Islands or mainland Denmark. These usually disembark at Seyðisfjörður, on Iceland’s east coast. From there, you’ll need to take a shuttle to reach Reykjavik.

Best ways to travel in Reykjavik

TtdR

Once you’re in the city, the best way to explore is by foot. Most of the things to see in Reykjavik are within walking distance from each other, and it’s a very walkable city.

However, we are in Iceland—so the weather can change quickly. A more reliable option is our Hop-on Hop-off bus service, which can take you to all of the main attractions and activities in Reykjavik.

And on the topic of weather, here are some activities to consider during bad weather in Iceland.

Things to see in Reykjavik

So, with the practicalities dealt with, what are some of the best sights in Reykjavik? These are top attractions and landmarks around the city.

1. Hallgrímskirkja church

Let’s start with perhaps the most famous building in Iceland: Hallgrímskirkja.

Hallgrímskirkja is the tallest church in the country—and one of the country’s tallest buildings overall. It’s named after the local poet, Hallgrímur Pétursson, but is often referred to as the Waterfall Church. That’s because it was inspired by the shape of Svartifoss, a waterfall in Iceland’s Vatnajökull National Park.

Rising 244 feet (74.5 metres) above downtown Reykjavik, Hallgrímskirkja’s mesmerising expressionist facade is visible from all parts of the city. And its height makes it a wonderful vantage point over the area too, if you want to climb to the top.

In front of the church, don’t miss the statue of Leif Eriksson, a Viking explorer who was one of the first Europeans to set foot in the Americas.

2. Harpa

TtdR3

Harpa is the phenomenal geometric concert hall in Reykjavik’s Old Harbour. And, along with Hallgrímskirkja, it’s one of the most striking examples of modern architecture in the country.

Completed in 2011, Harpa’s façade is inspired by the iconic basalt geology that you can see around Iceland. But while Harpa makes for a dazzling landmark in itself, it’s also one of the city’s main cultural hubs. For example, you could catch a performance from the renowned Icelandic Symphony Orchestra here, or else a local festival or lightshow.

Whatever your taste, Harpa is really one of the most striking things to see in Reykjavik.

3. Perlan

At a little distance from downtown Reykjavik is Perlan. An incredible natural museum, this is one of Reykjavik’s most recognisable landmarks. And thanks to its position on Öskjuhlíð hill, it also provides probably the most majestic view over the city and the hills across the fjord.

The Perlan building itself comprises a unique arrangement of hot water tanks with a glass dome placed on top. This peculiar building hosts an ice cave museum, alongside exhibitions on the nature and geology of the country.

The Perlan building sits on top of Öskjuhlíð, a wild green area in the heart of the city. The hill is worth a visit all by itself.

4. Sun Voyager

TtdR4

One of the most entrancing and unique things to see in Reykjavik was built in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the city’s being officially founded in 1786. That’s the so-called Sun Voyager, a sculpture of a ship that’s among the most photographed sights in town.

The sculpture sits on an artificial promontory close to the Harpa concert hall. Its magical salute to the sun makes it something not to be missed.

5. Laugavegur

If you’re strolling around downtown Reykjavik, don’t miss Laugavegur. This is the main shopping street in the capital, which you’ll find lined with charming bars, restaurants, and independent shops.

During the summer, Laugavegur is closed to traffic, making it a tranquil place for pedestrians to explore. Shop for clothes and jewellery in the local second-hand shops or stop for a drink in a bar. Or if you feel up to it, why not visit the peculiar Phallological Museum? It’s one of the very few museums in the world that celebrates male genitalia!

6. Skólavörðustígur

TtdR5

Like Laugavegur, Skólavörðustígur is one of Reykjavik’s central streets. This charming road leads up to the hill on which you’ll find the Hallgrímskirkja church.

The road itself is known for its design boutiques, art galleries, cafes, and shops. It’s a delightful place for a stroll and a great location to pick up some Icelandic souvenirs.

7. Austurvöllur

Austurvöllur is not just at the heart of downtown Reykjavik. It’s at the heart of the city’s civic and social life too.

Thanks to its central location—and its proximity to the Icelandic parliament (see below)—Austurvöllur has been the location of many political protests and public events throughout the centuries. During national celebrations, you can join in with festivities here too.

But that’s not all. During the midnight sun of the summer months, you’ll find friends and families chatting and sunbathing here long into the night. Why not crack open a beer and join them?

8. Nauthólsvík

Now, Reykjavik might not be the first place that you’d think of for a dip in the sea. But the city really is full of surprises. At the Nauthólsvík geothermal beach, you can enjoy a swim in mild waters on gorgeous golden sand.

The water on the beach is surrounded by an artificial wall, creating a lagoon that’s refilled at high tide. The Nauthólsvík lagoon is then heated by geothermal energy, enabling it to reach a comfortable 19 degrees.

If you don’t dare to take a dip, that’s okay. There are saunas, hot tubs, and opportunities for sailing courses too.

9. Grótta lighthouse

On the far north-western part of Reykjavik, you’ll find the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula, a nature reserve and the home of the Grótta lighthouse.

The lighthouse itself has been standing since the late nineteenth century, in an area that was once the site of an incredibly isolated farm. These days, you can visit the lighthouse at low tide, when the causeway emerges from the water.

The whole area of Seltjarnarnes is a glorious spot for birdwatching, or simply taking a stroll away from the bustle of the city. In the winter, it's also one of the best places close to the city to see the northern lights.

10. Höfði house

It may look like a fairly assuming—if quaint and picturesque—house from the outside. But Höfði house hosted one of the most important political meetings in the late 20th century. Here, Mikhail Gorbachev met Ronald Reagan in 1986 to end the Cold War.

The house itself was built in 1909 and has been the home of poets and ambassadors since. Legend has it that a ghost also makes the house its home, a fact that the Icelandic government hasn’t been able to deny.

You don’t need to spend the night in this historic site. But a stroll in the grounds could well be one of the most pleasant things to do in Reykjavik.

11. Parliament house (Alþingi)

Finally, the Alþingi, Iceland’s parliament, boasts the incredible title of the oldest parliament in the world. Established in 930 in Þingvellir National Park in the Golden Circle, you can visit the current home of this political assembly on Austurvöllur square.

Reykjavik’s Parliament House was built in 1880 and has become one of the oldest stone buildings in Iceland. The delightful building was once home to Iceland’s National Library, National Gallery, and a university. But now it’s dedicated entirely to politics.

You can take guided tours of the building—but only when the parliament is not in session.

Activities in Reykjavik

Visiting a city isn’t just about seeing the sights. Alongside many incredible things to see in the city, there are many things to do in Reykjavik too.

Here, we share some of our favourite activities to try in Reykjavik and around.

Relax at the Sky Lagoon

TtdR6

Just 15 minutes south of downtown Reykjavik, you’ll find Sky Lagoon, a brand-new thermal spa experience. It’s a gloriously relaxing place to unwind, powered by Iceland’s geothermal activity.

What makes the spa extra special is its design, inspired by the nature of Iceland. In the spa, you’ll feel immersed in the country’s scenery, with views over the Snæfellsjökull volcano and the Keilir mountain.

Find the Sky Lagoon at Kársnes Harbour, Kópavogur. Or let us handle the transport from the city centre with a Sky Lagoon Pure Pass and transfer.

Take an awesome Helicopter tour

Sure, there are many things to see in Reykjavik. But something really special is to witness the city from above on a helicopter tour.

Launching off from the Reykjavik Domestic Airport—only five minutes from downtown Reykjavik—you’ll witness many of Reykjavik’s main attractions from a completely different perspective.

Find out more about our Reykjavik summit helicopter tour.

Try the unique FlyOver Iceland experience

TtdR7

If you want to experience the glory of floating in the sky, but stay firmly on the ground, try Reykjavik’s FlyOver Iceland.

FlyOver Iceland is an immersive flight experience that simulates the feeling of flight. At the location in Grandi Harbour District, you’ll be strapped into the ride that will give you the sensation of soaring over the city and beyond.

It’s a completely unique way to see the majesty of Iceland’s landscapes. Book it with us.

Witness the wild wonder of whales

TtdR8

There are 23 different species of whale that live in the waters of Iceland. And you can get the chance to glimpse them for yourself on a whale watching tour from Reykjavik.

To see these awesome animals in their natural habitat is simply unforgettable.

Catch a glimpse of Iceland’s puffins

Alternatively, discover Iceland’s diverse birdlife on a puffin tour. Setting sail from Reykjavik’s Old Harbour, you can witness much of the wildlife that Iceland’s seas and skies have to offer—from guillemots to fulmars and Arctic terns.

A ride on the Puffin Express only takes an hour. But it’s an experience not to be missed.

Take the Reykjavik Cat-walk

You can get to know a different type of Icelandic wildlife on this cat tour of Reykjavik. Across two hours, you’ll explore the city and learn all about its relationship with our furry feline friends.

This fun way to explore the city will show you a side to Reykjavik you might not have expected. And 10% of the profits goes toward the Cat Protection Society.

Northern lights

TtdR9

There are few things as beautiful as the shimmering colours of the northern lights. And thanks to its northern location, Iceland is a famously excellent spot to see this otherworldly phenomenon.

The great news is that you don’t need to go deep into the wilderness to see them. Rather, you can catch a glimpse of this incredible show on a northern lights tour from Reykjavik.

Christmas & New Year’s

Christmas is a wonderful time to spend in Reykjavik. Aside from the snow on the hills, enchanting Christmas lights, and a charming festive vibe, you can experience the festivals, markets, and other seasonal events that bring the city to life.

Why not go ice skating in Ingolfstorg Square, or visit Reykjavik’s Christmas tree in Austurvöllur. Alternatively, you can discover the city on a Reykjavik Christmas walk, or venture out into the fjord for a New Year fireworks cruise.

Eating and drinking in Reykjavik

TtdR10

Finally, no guide to Reykjavik would be complete without a mention of the city’s vibrant food culture. Simply, Reykjavik is the best place in Iceland to sample the country’s unique cuisine. And a food (or booze!) experience in the city could be one of the best things you do on your trip.

What do Icelanders eat? Well, they’re surrounded by the sea—so seafood is an important feature on many menus. But it is not all fermented shark, although that is one of the most notorious Icelandic dishes.

Instead, you could try harðfiskur, or stockfish, a type of dried haddock or cod that used to be a staple with every meal. Alternatively, there’s Icelandic lobster, or plokkfiskur, a typical fish stew.

While there are also many types of meat, such as hangikjot (smoked lamb), pylsa (Icelandic hot dogs), and kjotsupa (a meat soup), vegetarians shouldn’t worry. You’ll find many traditional foods to delight the taste buds, as well as an array of contemporary restaurants in Reykjavik too.

You can experience many of these dishes and more on a Reykjavik food walk or a traditional Icelandic food lovers tour.

Why not join us on one of our beer tours too? Iceland has a long history of brewing (although beer was banned in the country for parts of the 20th century!). You can enjoy the incredible range of ales and meads that Iceland offers on a Reykjavik beer tour.

Or add something a little stronger on a Reykjavik beer and booze tour. You’ll discover Iceland’s complex history of alcohol, while enjoying drinks like Brennivín, a liquor made from fermented potato.

Explore the city with Reykjavik Excursions

TtdR11

There are so many activities in Reykjavik to keep you entertained—from sights to see across the city to experiences that promise to reveal a different side of Icelandic life.

Whatever it is you decide to do, let Reykjavik Excursions handle the transport. We can pick you up from the airport and take you into town. And with our hop-on hop-off bus service, we can show you around the city too.

Our great selection of Reykjavik city tours will show the very best that Iceland’s capital has to offer. Start exploring today.

REYKJAVIK EXCURSIONS BLOG

Get inspired! Information and tips and must see places in Iceland, fun facts, customs and more.

Northern Lights in Iceland: Your Guide

In this post, you can discover everything you need to know about seeing the aurora borealis in the land of fire and ice.

Read Blog

Things to Do in Reykjavik: Your Guide to the Main Attractions and Activities

May 3, 2022

Things to Do in Reykjavik: Your Guide to the Main Attractions and Activities

May 3, 2022

Reykjavik is the world’s most northerly capital city—but there’s so much more to it than its remote location. With its buzzing cultural scene, a picturesque coastal setting, and an incredible range of unique activities, Iceland’s capital really has a lot to offer.

In this guide, you’ll discover some of the most exciting things to do in Reykjavik—including nature and culture, nightlife and cuisine. And we’ll give you some practical tips on how to get around the city too.

Read on to find out what this magical city has in store. Then check out our Reykjavik tours to start exploring for yourself.

What is Reykjavik like?

The country’s biggest city and its administrative, cultural, and political heart, Reykjavik is a must-see for any visitor to Iceland. No matter what your plans are for your trip to the Land of Fire and Ice, you won’t want to miss a few days in the capital.

While Reykjavik is a small town by many countries’ standards—with a population of just over 120,000—it punches well above its weight in terms of the sights and adventures it offers. In few other cities will you find this intoxicating mix of contemporary art and culture, historical destinations, and natural wonder.

Founded in the 9th century, Reykjavik—actually meaning something like “Smokey Bay”—is thought to be the location of Iceland’s first permanent settlement. But it remained a fishing village for most of the following millennium. It wasn’t until the 20th century that it was finally made the capital.

Today, Reykjavik is cosmopolitan, vibrant, and proud of its unique heritage. On your visit, you’ll find out why it really has a lot to be proud of.

How to get to Reykjavik

Iceland is, of course, an island—and one that’s nearly 300 kilometres (186 miles) from its closest neighbour, Greenland. That means that options for arriving in its capital city are quite limited.

Most likely, if you’re visiting Reykjavik from the US or Europe, you’ll arrive at the Keflavik International Airport. It’s about 50 kilometres (31 miles) from the city centre, which you can reach by road in about 40 minutes.

While you can pay more for a taxi, we recommend taking the Flybus Airport Transfer, which runs every two hours between the airport and downtown Reykjavik.

For adventurous visitors, there’s also the chance to take a cruise to Iceland too, typically from the Faroe Islands or mainland Denmark. These usually disembark at Seyðisfjörður, on Iceland’s east coast. From there, you’ll need to take a shuttle to reach Reykjavik.

Best ways to travel in Reykjavik

TtdR

Once you’re in the city, the best way to explore is by foot. Most of the things to see in Reykjavik are within walking distance from each other, and it’s a very walkable city.

However, we are in Iceland—so the weather can change quickly. A more reliable option is our Hop-on Hop-off bus service, which can take you to all of the main attractions and activities in Reykjavik.

And on the topic of weather, here are some activities to consider during bad weather in Iceland.

Things to see in Reykjavik

So, with the practicalities dealt with, what are some of the best sights in Reykjavik? These are top attractions and landmarks around the city.

1. Hallgrímskirkja church

Let’s start with perhaps the most famous building in Iceland: Hallgrímskirkja.

Hallgrímskirkja is the tallest church in the country—and one of the country’s tallest buildings overall. It’s named after the local poet, Hallgrímur Pétursson, but is often referred to as the Waterfall Church. That’s because it was inspired by the shape of Svartifoss, a waterfall in Iceland’s Vatnajökull National Park.

Rising 244 feet (74.5 metres) above downtown Reykjavik, Hallgrímskirkja’s mesmerising expressionist facade is visible from all parts of the city. And its height makes it a wonderful vantage point over the area too, if you want to climb to the top.

In front of the church, don’t miss the statue of Leif Eriksson, a Viking explorer who was one of the first Europeans to set foot in the Americas.

2. Harpa

TtdR3

Harpa is the phenomenal geometric concert hall in Reykjavik’s Old Harbour. And, along with Hallgrímskirkja, it’s one of the most striking examples of modern architecture in the country.

Completed in 2011, Harpa’s façade is inspired by the iconic basalt geology that you can see around Iceland. But while Harpa makes for a dazzling landmark in itself, it’s also one of the city’s main cultural hubs. For example, you could catch a performance from the renowned Icelandic Symphony Orchestra here, or else a local festival or lightshow.

Whatever your taste, Harpa is really one of the most striking things to see in Reykjavik.

3. Perlan

At a little distance from downtown Reykjavik is Perlan. An incredible natural museum, this is one of Reykjavik’s most recognisable landmarks. And thanks to its position on Öskjuhlíð hill, it also provides probably the most majestic view over the city and the hills across the fjord.

The Perlan building itself comprises a unique arrangement of hot water tanks with a glass dome placed on top. This peculiar building hosts an ice cave museum, alongside exhibitions on the nature and geology of the country.

The Perlan building sits on top of Öskjuhlíð, a wild green area in the heart of the city. The hill is worth a visit all by itself.

4. Sun Voyager

TtdR4

One of the most entrancing and unique things to see in Reykjavik was built in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the city’s being officially founded in 1786. That’s the so-called Sun Voyager, a sculpture of a ship that’s among the most photographed sights in town.

The sculpture sits on an artificial promontory close to the Harpa concert hall. Its magical salute to the sun makes it something not to be missed.

5. Laugavegur

If you’re strolling around downtown Reykjavik, don’t miss Laugavegur. This is the main shopping street in the capital, which you’ll find lined with charming bars, restaurants, and independent shops.

During the summer, Laugavegur is closed to traffic, making it a tranquil place for pedestrians to explore. Shop for clothes and jewellery in the local second-hand shops or stop for a drink in a bar. Or if you feel up to it, why not visit the peculiar Phallological Museum? It’s one of the very few museums in the world that celebrates male genitalia!

6. Skólavörðustígur

TtdR5

Like Laugavegur, Skólavörðustígur is one of Reykjavik’s central streets. This charming road leads up to the hill on which you’ll find the Hallgrímskirkja church.

The road itself is known for its design boutiques, art galleries, cafes, and shops. It’s a delightful place for a stroll and a great location to pick up some Icelandic souvenirs.

7. Austurvöllur

Austurvöllur is not just at the heart of downtown Reykjavik. It’s at the heart of the city’s civic and social life too.

Thanks to its central location—and its proximity to the Icelandic parliament (see below)—Austurvöllur has been the location of many political protests and public events throughout the centuries. During national celebrations, you can join in with festivities here too.

But that’s not all. During the midnight sun of the summer months, you’ll find friends and families chatting and sunbathing here long into the night. Why not crack open a beer and join them?

8. Nauthólsvík

Now, Reykjavik might not be the first place that you’d think of for a dip in the sea. But the city really is full of surprises. At the Nauthólsvík geothermal beach, you can enjoy a swim in mild waters on gorgeous golden sand.

The water on the beach is surrounded by an artificial wall, creating a lagoon that’s refilled at high tide. The Nauthólsvík lagoon is then heated by geothermal energy, enabling it to reach a comfortable 19 degrees.

If you don’t dare to take a dip, that’s okay. There are saunas, hot tubs, and opportunities for sailing courses too.

9. Grótta lighthouse

On the far north-western part of Reykjavik, you’ll find the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula, a nature reserve and the home of the Grótta lighthouse.

The lighthouse itself has been standing since the late nineteenth century, in an area that was once the site of an incredibly isolated farm. These days, you can visit the lighthouse at low tide, when the causeway emerges from the water.

The whole area of Seltjarnarnes is a glorious spot for birdwatching, or simply taking a stroll away from the bustle of the city. In the winter, it's also one of the best places close to the city to see the northern lights.

10. Höfði house

It may look like a fairly assuming—if quaint and picturesque—house from the outside. But Höfði house hosted one of the most important political meetings in the late 20th century. Here, Mikhail Gorbachev met Ronald Reagan in 1986 to end the Cold War.

The house itself was built in 1909 and has been the home of poets and ambassadors since. Legend has it that a ghost also makes the house its home, a fact that the Icelandic government hasn’t been able to deny.

You don’t need to spend the night in this historic site. But a stroll in the grounds could well be one of the most pleasant things to do in Reykjavik.

11. Parliament house (Alþingi)

Finally, the Alþingi, Iceland’s parliament, boasts the incredible title of the oldest parliament in the world. Established in 930 in Þingvellir National Park in the Golden Circle, you can visit the current home of this political assembly on Austurvöllur square.

Reykjavik’s Parliament House was built in 1880 and has become one of the oldest stone buildings in Iceland. The delightful building was once home to Iceland’s National Library, National Gallery, and a university. But now it’s dedicated entirely to politics.

You can take guided tours of the building—but only when the parliament is not in session.

Activities in Reykjavik

Visiting a city isn’t just about seeing the sights. Alongside many incredible things to see in the city, there are many things to do in Reykjavik too.

Here, we share some of our favourite activities to try in Reykjavik and around.

Relax at the Sky Lagoon

TtdR6

Just 15 minutes south of downtown Reykjavik, you’ll find Sky Lagoon, a brand-new thermal spa experience. It’s a gloriously relaxing place to unwind, powered by Iceland’s geothermal activity.

What makes the spa extra special is its design, inspired by the nature of Iceland. In the spa, you’ll feel immersed in the country’s scenery, with views over the Snæfellsjökull volcano and the Keilir mountain.

Find the Sky Lagoon at Kársnes Harbour, Kópavogur. Or let us handle the transport from the city centre with a Sky Lagoon Pure Pass and transfer.

Take an awesome Helicopter tour

Sure, there are many things to see in Reykjavik. But something really special is to witness the city from above on a helicopter tour.

Launching off from the Reykjavik Domestic Airport—only five minutes from downtown Reykjavik—you’ll witness many of Reykjavik’s main attractions from a completely different perspective.

Find out more about our Reykjavik summit helicopter tour.

Try the unique FlyOver Iceland experience

TtdR7

If you want to experience the glory of floating in the sky, but stay firmly on the ground, try Reykjavik’s FlyOver Iceland.

FlyOver Iceland is an immersive flight experience that simulates the feeling of flight. At the location in Grandi Harbour District, you’ll be strapped into the ride that will give you the sensation of soaring over the city and beyond.

It’s a completely unique way to see the majesty of Iceland’s landscapes. Book it with us.

Witness the wild wonder of whales

TtdR8

There are 23 different species of whale that live in the waters of Iceland. And you can get the chance to glimpse them for yourself on a whale watching tour from Reykjavik.

To see these awesome animals in their natural habitat is simply unforgettable.

Catch a glimpse of Iceland’s puffins

Alternatively, discover Iceland’s diverse birdlife on a puffin tour. Setting sail from Reykjavik’s Old Harbour, you can witness much of the wildlife that Iceland’s seas and skies have to offer—from guillemots to fulmars and Arctic terns.

A ride on the Puffin Express only takes an hour. But it’s an experience not to be missed.

Take the Reykjavik Cat-walk

You can get to know a different type of Icelandic wildlife on this cat tour of Reykjavik. Across two hours, you’ll explore the city and learn all about its relationship with our furry feline friends.

This fun way to explore the city will show you a side to Reykjavik you might not have expected. And 10% of the profits goes toward the Cat Protection Society.

Northern lights

TtdR9

There are few things as beautiful as the shimmering colours of the northern lights. And thanks to its northern location, Iceland is a famously excellent spot to see this otherworldly phenomenon.

The great news is that you don’t need to go deep into the wilderness to see them. Rather, you can catch a glimpse of this incredible show on a northern lights tour from Reykjavik.

Christmas & New Year’s

Christmas is a wonderful time to spend in Reykjavik. Aside from the snow on the hills, enchanting Christmas lights, and a charming festive vibe, you can experience the festivals, markets, and other seasonal events that bring the city to life.

Why not go ice skating in Ingolfstorg Square, or visit Reykjavik’s Christmas tree in Austurvöllur. Alternatively, you can discover the city on a Reykjavik Christmas walk, or venture out into the fjord for a New Year fireworks cruise.

Eating and drinking in Reykjavik

TtdR10

Finally, no guide to Reykjavik would be complete without a mention of the city’s vibrant food culture. Simply, Reykjavik is the best place in Iceland to sample the country’s unique cuisine. And a food (or booze!) experience in the city could be one of the best things you do on your trip.

What do Icelanders eat? Well, they’re surrounded by the sea—so seafood is an important feature on many menus. But it is not all fermented shark, although that is one of the most notorious Icelandic dishes.

Instead, you could try harðfiskur, or stockfish, a type of dried haddock or cod that used to be a staple with every meal. Alternatively, there’s Icelandic lobster, or plokkfiskur, a typical fish stew.

While there are also many types of meat, such as hangikjot (smoked lamb), pylsa (Icelandic hot dogs), and kjotsupa (a meat soup), vegetarians shouldn’t worry. You’ll find many traditional foods to delight the taste buds, as well as an array of contemporary restaurants in Reykjavik too.

You can experience many of these dishes and more on a Reykjavik food walk or a traditional Icelandic food lovers tour.

Why not join us on one of our beer tours too? Iceland has a long history of brewing (although beer was banned in the country for parts of the 20th century!). You can enjoy the incredible range of ales and meads that Iceland offers on a Reykjavik beer tour.

Or add something a little stronger on a Reykjavik beer and booze tour. You’ll discover Iceland’s complex history of alcohol, while enjoying drinks like Brennivín, a liquor made from fermented potato.

Explore the city with Reykjavik Excursions

TtdR11

There are so many activities in Reykjavik to keep you entertained—from sights to see across the city to experiences that promise to reveal a different side of Icelandic life.

Whatever it is you decide to do, let Reykjavik Excursions handle the transport. We can pick you up from the airport and take you into town. And with our hop-on hop-off bus service, we can show you around the city too.

Our great selection of Reykjavik city tours will show the very best that Iceland’s capital has to offer. Start exploring today.

REYKJAVIK EXCURSIONS BLOG

Get inspired! Information and tips and must see places in Iceland, fun facts, customs and more.

Northern Lights in Iceland: Your Guide

In this post, you can discover everything you need to know about seeing the aurora borealis in the land of fire and ice.

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