Reykjavík on a rainy day - your guide to the city’s best indoor activities

There’s a wealth of indoor activities in Iceland to keep you entertained in the city and beyond when it’s raining. Here are some of the best.

23. september 2022

Reykjavík on a rainy day - your guide to the city’s best indoor activities

There’s a wealth of indoor activities in Iceland to keep you entertained in the city and beyond when it’s raining. Here are some of the best.

23. september 2022

The rain may be falling on Reykjavik again but no worries, Iceland’s capital offers an array of exciting indoor activities. Apart from Reykjavik’s most spectacular landmarks - Harpa concert hall and Hallgrímskirkja Church - there are fascinating museums and trendy restaurants and bars in which to take shelter. Reykjavik Excursions offer an incredible thirty tours & activities in Reykjavik, Iceland. Eat and drink your way around the city, find out about Iceland’s cultural and natural heritage in the museums - or just go with the flow in the rain and get completely wet in an indoor pool or outdoor hot spring. Gen up on the many things to do in Reykjavik in this handy guide.

Where to go in Reykjavik when it’s raining

Perlan

Voted ‘Best of the Best’ this year by Tripadvisor, you can experience the ‘Wonders of Iceland’ without a single drop of the wet stuff falling on you. The futuristic-looking Perlan, with its great glass dome balanced on six cylindrical water tanks, was designed by renowned architect, Ingimundur Sveinsson. It’s a striking sight on top of Reyjavik’s 60m-high hill at Öskjuhlíð - particularly when lit up at night. Is the sky too overcast to experience the northern lights? No worries: experience the aurora free of cold and rain in the comfort of the Northern Lights Planetarium. The best of Iceland’s writers, photographers and musicians enhance the dance of the aurora with their artistic interpretations. Explore the unique landscapes of Iceland, cross time and space to discover the science behind the northern lights. Discover the more fanciful stories and legends that sought to explain the phenomenon over centuries. Reykjavik Excursions invite you to create your own ‘northern lights dance’ in the Northern Lights Planetarium Show. And there’s more: walk through a real 100-metre-long Ice Cave, discover Iceland’s coastal and glacial wonders at Perlan and literally feel the power of the island’s volcanoes and earthquakes. When you’ve explored all the interactive exhibitions, head up to the Observation Deck with panoramic views of the city and fuel up at the restaurant, cafe or ice-cream parlour.

Harpa

Harpa, meaning both harp and first month of spring, is a place of hope and inspiration - particularly poignant since the project almost came to a halt after the financial crash of 2008. No question, Harpa is one of the world’s most beautiful concert halls. The facade was designed by Olafur Eliasson, its steel framework clad with geometric coloured and clear glass panels. Inspired by Iceland’s landscapes, specifically its columnar basalt geology, the hues of the coloured glass panels alter with the ever-changing Icelandic light; the clear glass capturing fragments of the surrounding city, harbour and sky. Simply wander around this award-winning building admiring its creative architecture or explore the hall’s shops and restaurants. Even better, book a ballet, drama or concert and luxuriate in the beauty of this gorgeous building, home to The Iceland Symphony Orchestra and Icelandic Opera.

When the skies clear - see the northern lights for real


NL myndir5

Through autumn, winter and spring, Reykjavik Excursions offer an expert-led tour of the northern lights. The guides seek out the best locations, away from city lights, to see the aurora at their best.

Hallgrímskirkja

You can’t fail to be impressed by the soaring chalk-white Lutheran church of Hallgrím. It’s the largest church in Iceland and one of the tallest buildings in the country. Rising up from the hilltop of Skólavörðuholt, the church is visible from much of the city. But it’s the unique structure of this pale church that will stir your soul. The unusual steeple rises up in stepped columns from the ‘wings’ of the church. As with Harpa’s Olafur Eliasson, architect Guðjón Samúelsson was inspired by Iceland’s dramatic landscapes. The stepped steeple hexagonal columns of the spire are reminiscent of Iceland’s great volcanic mountains, the concrete columns and sloping sides of the church appearing like cooling lava, imitating the ‘organ-pipe’ formations of hardened basalt. The interior is stark with a simple beauty. Natural light flows through the clear-glass windows, falling between the gaps of the hexagonal columns, the light-filled sanctuary illuminating the entire church. If you are lucky, you may capture an organist, choir or orchestra in rehearsal, the music soaring in the cavernous space. Even better, attend one of the many music events that take place over the year for a truly soul-stirring experience. Before leaving, climb up to the observation tower to capture panoramic photos of the city backed by the dark basalt mountains (snow-capped for much of the year) that so inspired Guðjón Samúelsson.

When the skies clear - go on a South Shore adventure


RR 2

The basalt formations that inspired the architecture of Harpa and Hallgrímskirkja can be seen for real at Reynisfjara on this South Shore Adventure tour. The frothing white surf of the Atlantic contrasts the black lava beach that’s backed by the hexagonal basalt columns replicated in the facade of the concert hall. Other highlights of the South Shore trip include the glacier of Eyjafjallajökull and the waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss.

National Museum of Iceland

If you want to learn about Iceland’s unique cultural heritage, look no further than the National Museum of Iceland in Reykjavik. The exhibits chronicle Iceland’s history from those first intrepid settlers crossing the high seas to the inhospitable island to the building of the ultra-modern International Reykjavik Airport. There are around 2,000 historical objects and a series of fascinating images that have captured the cultural development of Iceland in the 20th century.

The Settlement Exhibition

Go underground to step into the distant past with the aid of up-to-the-minute digital technology. This excavation site has literally uncovered a Viking past, revealing a 10th century longhouse. With the aid of modern interactive technology, the excavations spring to life. You can see how Viking settlements were built and how the settlers lived and worked.

Whales of Iceland

The world of whales is a world of superlatives. At the Whales of Iceland museum, experience the largest whale exhibition in Europe with life-sized models of 23 different kinds of whales, all of which have been spotted in Icelandic territorial waters. The blue whale is the biggest of them all - nearly the length of a basketball court. Detailed displays and interactive exhibits allow you to enter into the unseen world of the whale beneath the ocean. Finish with the Fin Whale Theatre, screening documentaries throughout the day. Join a Whales of Iceland tour to find out all about the Earth’s biggest sea mammals.

When the sky clears - see whales in their natural habitat


WW2

Why not combine a visit to the museum with a real-life three-dimensional Whale Watching tour out on the open sea, and witness whales in their natural setting. Out on the Atlantic, off Reykjavik, experience a variety of sea-life from minke and humpback whales to porpoises and dolphins from Andrea, Reykjavik Excursions large and comfortable whale-watching boat.

Flyover Iceland

RR 5

Take a virtual tour at FlyOver Iceland in the Grandi Harbour District and fly over the ice-caps, glaciers, volcanic mountains and coast of Iceland. The latest technology will give you the sensation that you’re really flying. Special effects include wind, mist and scents along with the sensation of flight motion. The flight’s guide is Sú Vitra, story-teller and resident troll - yes, really - who will take you on a journey through the history of the Icelandic settlers and the natural history of a dynamic geology. Join a tour of FlyOver Iceland here.

Sky Lagoon

RR 6

The Sky Lagoon thermal spa may be outside but it doesn’t matter; you’re only going to get wet anyway. And even if the rain is icy-cold, you can luxuriate in the bath-warm waters. Just a few kilometres from the city centre, the oceanside spa offers incredible views of the Atlantic through the steaming waters. Relax with a drink from the floating lagoon bar and experience the 7-step ritual that takes you on a healing journey through hot and cold water, water steam, dry heat and fresh air. To find out why the spa is something special, read this ultimate guide to the Sky Lagoon. There are lots of tour options on offer with Reykjavik Excursions. Book your ticket to the Sky Lagoon and enjoy a sensational - and sensory - experience.

Swimming pools in Reykjavik

RR 8

With a population of just over 135,00 inhabitants, Reykjavik has more than its fair share of swimming pools compared to larger European cities. From the capital’s centre to the surrounding suburbs, every area of the wider city has its own swimming pool whether it’s at a leisure or sports centre, a training pool, state-of-the-art spa resort or public pool. Check out Sundhöllin, the oldest pool in the centre with great views of the iconic Hallgrímskirkja Lutheran church from the sundeck. Arbaejarlaug, out in the suburbs, has a lovely outlook over the Elliðarárdalur valley, an outdoor pool with waterslide, fountain, bridge and hot-tub area. Close to the campsite, Laugardalslaug has one indoor and two outdoor pools, several hot tubs, water slides and a beach volleyball court. Check out the city pools and hot springs further afield in this ultimate guide.

Food & Drink

RR 7

Are you a foodie? There’s no better way to enjoy a rainy day than to eat and drink your way around Reykjavik. Spend four pleasurable hours visiting six unique restaurants in the company of a knowledgeable local to guide you through the intricacies of Reykjavik’s cuisine. Apart from the city’s well-known rated restaurants, you’ll experience small family-owned eateries and other secret local hang-outs frequented by city-dwellers in the know. No challenging ram’s testicles or fermented shark will be on offer - just some of the most delicious traditional Icelandic fare that has endured the test of time. Try succulent Icelandic lamb, home-made Icelandic ice cream, great tasting local cheeses and Skyr, the famous Icelandic hot-dog - and, of course, flavoursome seafood fresh from the Atlantic. Join a Reykjavik walking tour - just make sure you arrive with an empty stomach!

Alternatively join a small-group tour and sample at least ten traditional foods (meat, fish and dairy) while finding out about the farming and culinary history of Iceland and grabbing a few tips from your guide.

If you’d rather go on a ‘pub crawl’, join the Reykjavik Beer and Booze Tour. On the way, visit three great city bars, sample craft beers or Icelandic snaps. Your guide will entertain you with the bizarre history of alcohol in Iceland.

Indoor activities outside Reykjavik

The Lava Tunnel

RR 9

You don’t have to stay indoors in the city to out-fox the rain. Nature also has its rain-free environments. Head underground to escape a soaking. Take a tour of Raufarhólshellir Lava Tunnel just thirty minutes from Reykjavik and witness the inner workings of a volcanic eruption while you walk in the pathway of a lava flow. The lava flow is one of the biggest in Iceland - up to 30 metres wide and 10 metres high. The collapsed lava tube entrance has created beautiful columns of light, while the different mineral rock types display an array of colours on the tunnel’s walls. While you’ll escape the rain, you will still need a raincoat to protect you from the ceiling drips. But enduring the four-degree temperature and icy drips are well-worth it as you witness the impact of nature in this otherworldly lava tube.

Lava Cave

Two hours from Reykjavik, Víðgelmir cave is home to one of the largest natural lava caves in the world and the largest of its kind in Iceland at 148,000 m3. The lava cave shows off the dazzling colours and patterns of the lava flow, a process of magma flux and hardening. Not surprisingly, this site was chosen for a Hollywood film. Combine a guided tour of Iceland’s largest lava cave with visits to Europe’s most powerful hot spring and two spectacular lava waterfalls.

LAVA Centre

RR 10

Prefer to experience the geology of lava flows, volcanoes and earthquakes in a more comfortable environment? The LAVA Centre has the answer. It’s situated at the gateway to Iceland’s South Coast of Iceland, an area renowned for its sleeping volcanoes and black lava beaches. After a visit to the LAVA Centre you’ll have a much greater understanding of the force of Iceland’s volcanoes as well as how and why they happened. The interactive, high-tech exhibition is a hands-on, multi-sensory experience, winning awards for its digital creativity and innovation. You’ll see how active Iceland is on the live earthquake monitors. The movie on the recent eruption at Fagradalsfjall brings you close to the power of volcanic eruptions with its high-definition and sound. Join a tour at the LAVA Centre with its volcano and earthquake exhibition.

Lava Show

RR 11

Experience the only live lava show in the world at the beautiful coastal settlement of Vik on the South Coast. Find out why the volcanoes in nearby Katla UNESCO Global Geopark are considered some of the most dangerous in the World. Allow yourself to be taken back in time to 1918 when Katla erupted and caused catastrophe locally, nationally and even internationally. Put on your ‘security goggles’ and watch lava flow through the auditorium. Listen to it bubble and crackle and feel the immense power of nature. Even the temperature in the showroom will start to rise. It will feel as if you’re right there in the fearsome moment of the eruption. Watch the lava cool, bright orange turn to grey, then black. When you leave the auditorium, you will understand how lava becomes an animated force, first fiery-hot and liquid in form, then steaming in its spent form before it hardens and becomes inanimate. Join an Icelandic Lava Show tour and feel the thrill of one of Iceland’s most exciting experiences.

Does it rain a lot in Reykjavik?

Reykjavik receives about 350mm of rain and snow every year. That’s a lot! But it’s part of Iceland’s rain-misted charm. Get out your waterproof gear and, head down, stride out into the city before taking cover in a warm heritage museum, cafe or bar.

What is the rainiest month in Iceland?

On average, precipitation is highest in December in Reykjavik. This includes both snow and rain, of course.

What is the best month to go to Iceland?

June to August are the busiest months in Iceland for tourism. The weather is warmer and the long days of light are invigorating. If you want to beat the crowds, however, why not come out of season? With the longer nights, the chances of seeing the northern lights are higher. Winter is the season when bathing in a geothermal pool is at its most magical . Sit back with a wine when the skies have cleared and take in the heavens ablaze with stars. Perhaps, the snow or rain will start to dance around you. Perhaps, just perhaps, the sky will put on a light show like no other. Witness the swirling colours of the aurora shimmer and dance. It’s an experience like no other. For the ultimate spa experience, rain or snow, head for the Blue Lagoon and Sky Lagoon - both within easy reach of Reykjavik. Find out the best time to visit Iceland in this handy guide.

There’s so much choice on rainy days in Reykjavik you needn’t worry about a soaking. The city’s heritage museums and attractions will keep you busy when the skies darken. The city’s food will warm you through. Don’t know where to start? Browse through the many Reykjavik Tours on offer. When you’ve finished exploring the capital, take one of the many coach tours on offer with Reykjavik Excursions and see the many natural highlights of Iceland from a comfortable seat. Shelter from the rain in one of Iceland’s thrilling lava caves - the odd drip apart - and find out about these volcanic creations at the LAVA Centre, taking in the Lava show at Vik. Best of all, why not go the whole way and get thoroughly wet? You can’t visit Iceland without visiting one of its many superb geothermal pools. Submerging yourself to the neck in steaming water while the rain comes down is intoxicating!

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!

Northern Lights in Iceland: Your Guide

In this post, you can discover everything you need to know about seeing the aurora borealis in the land of fire and ice.

Lesa blogg

Reykjavík on a rainy day - your guide to the city’s best indoor activities

There’s a wealth of indoor activities in Iceland to keep you entertained in the city and beyond when it’s raining. Here are some of the best.

23. september 2022

Reykjavík on a rainy day - your guide to the city’s best indoor activities

There’s a wealth of indoor activities in Iceland to keep you entertained in the city and beyond when it’s raining. Here are some of the best.

23. september 2022

The rain may be falling on Reykjavik again but no worries, Iceland’s capital offers an array of exciting indoor activities. Apart from Reykjavik’s most spectacular landmarks - Harpa concert hall and Hallgrímskirkja Church - there are fascinating museums and trendy restaurants and bars in which to take shelter. Reykjavik Excursions offer an incredible thirty tours & activities in Reykjavik, Iceland. Eat and drink your way around the city, find out about Iceland’s cultural and natural heritage in the museums - or just go with the flow in the rain and get completely wet in an indoor pool or outdoor hot spring. Gen up on the many things to do in Reykjavik in this handy guide.

Where to go in Reykjavik when it’s raining

Perlan

Voted ‘Best of the Best’ this year by Tripadvisor, you can experience the ‘Wonders of Iceland’ without a single drop of the wet stuff falling on you. The futuristic-looking Perlan, with its great glass dome balanced on six cylindrical water tanks, was designed by renowned architect, Ingimundur Sveinsson. It’s a striking sight on top of Reyjavik’s 60m-high hill at Öskjuhlíð - particularly when lit up at night. Is the sky too overcast to experience the northern lights? No worries: experience the aurora free of cold and rain in the comfort of the Northern Lights Planetarium. The best of Iceland’s writers, photographers and musicians enhance the dance of the aurora with their artistic interpretations. Explore the unique landscapes of Iceland, cross time and space to discover the science behind the northern lights. Discover the more fanciful stories and legends that sought to explain the phenomenon over centuries. Reykjavik Excursions invite you to create your own ‘northern lights dance’ in the Northern Lights Planetarium Show. And there’s more: walk through a real 100-metre-long Ice Cave, discover Iceland’s coastal and glacial wonders at Perlan and literally feel the power of the island’s volcanoes and earthquakes. When you’ve explored all the interactive exhibitions, head up to the Observation Deck with panoramic views of the city and fuel up at the restaurant, cafe or ice-cream parlour.

Harpa

Harpa, meaning both harp and first month of spring, is a place of hope and inspiration - particularly poignant since the project almost came to a halt after the financial crash of 2008. No question, Harpa is one of the world’s most beautiful concert halls. The facade was designed by Olafur Eliasson, its steel framework clad with geometric coloured and clear glass panels. Inspired by Iceland’s landscapes, specifically its columnar basalt geology, the hues of the coloured glass panels alter with the ever-changing Icelandic light; the clear glass capturing fragments of the surrounding city, harbour and sky. Simply wander around this award-winning building admiring its creative architecture or explore the hall’s shops and restaurants. Even better, book a ballet, drama or concert and luxuriate in the beauty of this gorgeous building, home to The Iceland Symphony Orchestra and Icelandic Opera.

When the skies clear - see the northern lights for real


NL myndir5

Through autumn, winter and spring, Reykjavik Excursions offer an expert-led tour of the northern lights. The guides seek out the best locations, away from city lights, to see the aurora at their best.

Hallgrímskirkja

You can’t fail to be impressed by the soaring chalk-white Lutheran church of Hallgrím. It’s the largest church in Iceland and one of the tallest buildings in the country. Rising up from the hilltop of Skólavörðuholt, the church is visible from much of the city. But it’s the unique structure of this pale church that will stir your soul. The unusual steeple rises up in stepped columns from the ‘wings’ of the church. As with Harpa’s Olafur Eliasson, architect Guðjón Samúelsson was inspired by Iceland’s dramatic landscapes. The stepped steeple hexagonal columns of the spire are reminiscent of Iceland’s great volcanic mountains, the concrete columns and sloping sides of the church appearing like cooling lava, imitating the ‘organ-pipe’ formations of hardened basalt. The interior is stark with a simple beauty. Natural light flows through the clear-glass windows, falling between the gaps of the hexagonal columns, the light-filled sanctuary illuminating the entire church. If you are lucky, you may capture an organist, choir or orchestra in rehearsal, the music soaring in the cavernous space. Even better, attend one of the many music events that take place over the year for a truly soul-stirring experience. Before leaving, climb up to the observation tower to capture panoramic photos of the city backed by the dark basalt mountains (snow-capped for much of the year) that so inspired Guðjón Samúelsson.

When the skies clear - go on a South Shore adventure


RR 2

The basalt formations that inspired the architecture of Harpa and Hallgrímskirkja can be seen for real at Reynisfjara on this South Shore Adventure tour. The frothing white surf of the Atlantic contrasts the black lava beach that’s backed by the hexagonal basalt columns replicated in the facade of the concert hall. Other highlights of the South Shore trip include the glacier of Eyjafjallajökull and the waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss.

National Museum of Iceland

If you want to learn about Iceland’s unique cultural heritage, look no further than the National Museum of Iceland in Reykjavik. The exhibits chronicle Iceland’s history from those first intrepid settlers crossing the high seas to the inhospitable island to the building of the ultra-modern International Reykjavik Airport. There are around 2,000 historical objects and a series of fascinating images that have captured the cultural development of Iceland in the 20th century.

The Settlement Exhibition

Go underground to step into the distant past with the aid of up-to-the-minute digital technology. This excavation site has literally uncovered a Viking past, revealing a 10th century longhouse. With the aid of modern interactive technology, the excavations spring to life. You can see how Viking settlements were built and how the settlers lived and worked.

Whales of Iceland

The world of whales is a world of superlatives. At the Whales of Iceland museum, experience the largest whale exhibition in Europe with life-sized models of 23 different kinds of whales, all of which have been spotted in Icelandic territorial waters. The blue whale is the biggest of them all - nearly the length of a basketball court. Detailed displays and interactive exhibits allow you to enter into the unseen world of the whale beneath the ocean. Finish with the Fin Whale Theatre, screening documentaries throughout the day. Join a Whales of Iceland tour to find out all about the Earth’s biggest sea mammals.

When the sky clears - see whales in their natural habitat


WW2

Why not combine a visit to the museum with a real-life three-dimensional Whale Watching tour out on the open sea, and witness whales in their natural setting. Out on the Atlantic, off Reykjavik, experience a variety of sea-life from minke and humpback whales to porpoises and dolphins from Andrea, Reykjavik Excursions large and comfortable whale-watching boat.

Flyover Iceland

RR 5

Take a virtual tour at FlyOver Iceland in the Grandi Harbour District and fly over the ice-caps, glaciers, volcanic mountains and coast of Iceland. The latest technology will give you the sensation that you’re really flying. Special effects include wind, mist and scents along with the sensation of flight motion. The flight’s guide is Sú Vitra, story-teller and resident troll - yes, really - who will take you on a journey through the history of the Icelandic settlers and the natural history of a dynamic geology. Join a tour of FlyOver Iceland here.

Sky Lagoon

RR 6

The Sky Lagoon thermal spa may be outside but it doesn’t matter; you’re only going to get wet anyway. And even if the rain is icy-cold, you can luxuriate in the bath-warm waters. Just a few kilometres from the city centre, the oceanside spa offers incredible views of the Atlantic through the steaming waters. Relax with a drink from the floating lagoon bar and experience the 7-step ritual that takes you on a healing journey through hot and cold water, water steam, dry heat and fresh air. To find out why the spa is something special, read this ultimate guide to the Sky Lagoon. There are lots of tour options on offer with Reykjavik Excursions. Book your ticket to the Sky Lagoon and enjoy a sensational - and sensory - experience.

Swimming pools in Reykjavik

RR 8

With a population of just over 135,00 inhabitants, Reykjavik has more than its fair share of swimming pools compared to larger European cities. From the capital’s centre to the surrounding suburbs, every area of the wider city has its own swimming pool whether it’s at a leisure or sports centre, a training pool, state-of-the-art spa resort or public pool. Check out Sundhöllin, the oldest pool in the centre with great views of the iconic Hallgrímskirkja Lutheran church from the sundeck. Arbaejarlaug, out in the suburbs, has a lovely outlook over the Elliðarárdalur valley, an outdoor pool with waterslide, fountain, bridge and hot-tub area. Close to the campsite, Laugardalslaug has one indoor and two outdoor pools, several hot tubs, water slides and a beach volleyball court. Check out the city pools and hot springs further afield in this ultimate guide.

Food & Drink

RR 7

Are you a foodie? There’s no better way to enjoy a rainy day than to eat and drink your way around Reykjavik. Spend four pleasurable hours visiting six unique restaurants in the company of a knowledgeable local to guide you through the intricacies of Reykjavik’s cuisine. Apart from the city’s well-known rated restaurants, you’ll experience small family-owned eateries and other secret local hang-outs frequented by city-dwellers in the know. No challenging ram’s testicles or fermented shark will be on offer - just some of the most delicious traditional Icelandic fare that has endured the test of time. Try succulent Icelandic lamb, home-made Icelandic ice cream, great tasting local cheeses and Skyr, the famous Icelandic hot-dog - and, of course, flavoursome seafood fresh from the Atlantic. Join a Reykjavik walking tour - just make sure you arrive with an empty stomach!

Alternatively join a small-group tour and sample at least ten traditional foods (meat, fish and dairy) while finding out about the farming and culinary history of Iceland and grabbing a few tips from your guide.

If you’d rather go on a ‘pub crawl’, join the Reykjavik Beer and Booze Tour. On the way, visit three great city bars, sample craft beers or Icelandic snaps. Your guide will entertain you with the bizarre history of alcohol in Iceland.

Indoor activities outside Reykjavik

The Lava Tunnel

RR 9

You don’t have to stay indoors in the city to out-fox the rain. Nature also has its rain-free environments. Head underground to escape a soaking. Take a tour of Raufarhólshellir Lava Tunnel just thirty minutes from Reykjavik and witness the inner workings of a volcanic eruption while you walk in the pathway of a lava flow. The lava flow is one of the biggest in Iceland - up to 30 metres wide and 10 metres high. The collapsed lava tube entrance has created beautiful columns of light, while the different mineral rock types display an array of colours on the tunnel’s walls. While you’ll escape the rain, you will still need a raincoat to protect you from the ceiling drips. But enduring the four-degree temperature and icy drips are well-worth it as you witness the impact of nature in this otherworldly lava tube.

Lava Cave

Two hours from Reykjavik, Víðgelmir cave is home to one of the largest natural lava caves in the world and the largest of its kind in Iceland at 148,000 m3. The lava cave shows off the dazzling colours and patterns of the lava flow, a process of magma flux and hardening. Not surprisingly, this site was chosen for a Hollywood film. Combine a guided tour of Iceland’s largest lava cave with visits to Europe’s most powerful hot spring and two spectacular lava waterfalls.

LAVA Centre

RR 10

Prefer to experience the geology of lava flows, volcanoes and earthquakes in a more comfortable environment? The LAVA Centre has the answer. It’s situated at the gateway to Iceland’s South Coast of Iceland, an area renowned for its sleeping volcanoes and black lava beaches. After a visit to the LAVA Centre you’ll have a much greater understanding of the force of Iceland’s volcanoes as well as how and why they happened. The interactive, high-tech exhibition is a hands-on, multi-sensory experience, winning awards for its digital creativity and innovation. You’ll see how active Iceland is on the live earthquake monitors. The movie on the recent eruption at Fagradalsfjall brings you close to the power of volcanic eruptions with its high-definition and sound. Join a tour at the LAVA Centre with its volcano and earthquake exhibition.

Lava Show

RR 11

Experience the only live lava show in the world at the beautiful coastal settlement of Vik on the South Coast. Find out why the volcanoes in nearby Katla UNESCO Global Geopark are considered some of the most dangerous in the World. Allow yourself to be taken back in time to 1918 when Katla erupted and caused catastrophe locally, nationally and even internationally. Put on your ‘security goggles’ and watch lava flow through the auditorium. Listen to it bubble and crackle and feel the immense power of nature. Even the temperature in the showroom will start to rise. It will feel as if you’re right there in the fearsome moment of the eruption. Watch the lava cool, bright orange turn to grey, then black. When you leave the auditorium, you will understand how lava becomes an animated force, first fiery-hot and liquid in form, then steaming in its spent form before it hardens and becomes inanimate. Join an Icelandic Lava Show tour and feel the thrill of one of Iceland’s most exciting experiences.

Does it rain a lot in Reykjavik?

Reykjavik receives about 350mm of rain and snow every year. That’s a lot! But it’s part of Iceland’s rain-misted charm. Get out your waterproof gear and, head down, stride out into the city before taking cover in a warm heritage museum, cafe or bar.

What is the rainiest month in Iceland?

On average, precipitation is highest in December in Reykjavik. This includes both snow and rain, of course.

What is the best month to go to Iceland?

June to August are the busiest months in Iceland for tourism. The weather is warmer and the long days of light are invigorating. If you want to beat the crowds, however, why not come out of season? With the longer nights, the chances of seeing the northern lights are higher. Winter is the season when bathing in a geothermal pool is at its most magical . Sit back with a wine when the skies have cleared and take in the heavens ablaze with stars. Perhaps, the snow or rain will start to dance around you. Perhaps, just perhaps, the sky will put on a light show like no other. Witness the swirling colours of the aurora shimmer and dance. It’s an experience like no other. For the ultimate spa experience, rain or snow, head for the Blue Lagoon and Sky Lagoon - both within easy reach of Reykjavik. Find out the best time to visit Iceland in this handy guide.

There’s so much choice on rainy days in Reykjavik you needn’t worry about a soaking. The city’s heritage museums and attractions will keep you busy when the skies darken. The city’s food will warm you through. Don’t know where to start? Browse through the many Reykjavik Tours on offer. When you’ve finished exploring the capital, take one of the many coach tours on offer with Reykjavik Excursions and see the many natural highlights of Iceland from a comfortable seat. Shelter from the rain in one of Iceland’s thrilling lava caves - the odd drip apart - and find out about these volcanic creations at the LAVA Centre, taking in the Lava show at Vik. Best of all, why not go the whole way and get thoroughly wet? You can’t visit Iceland without visiting one of its many superb geothermal pools. Submerging yourself to the neck in steaming water while the rain comes down is intoxicating!

Blogg

Fáðu innblástur! Upplýsingar og góð ráð, áhugaverðir áfangastaðir, skemmtilegar staðreyndar og margt fleira. Bloggið okkar er á ensku en það er stórskemmtilegt engu að síður!

Northern Lights in Iceland: Your Guide

In this post, you can discover everything you need to know about seeing the aurora borealis in the land of fire and ice.

Lesa blogg